libido

(redirected from Decreased libido)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

libido

 [lĭ-be´do, lĭ-bi´do] (L.)
1. sexual desire.
2. the psychic energy derived from instinctive biological drives; in early freudian theory it was restricted to the sexual drive, then expanded to include all expressions of love and pleasure, but the concept has evolved to include also the death instinct. freud postulated that libido development occurs in distinct stages: the oral stage, anal stage, and genital stage. Mental illnesses are therefore considered disturbances of libido development, such as regression to an earlier phase. jung proposed that although libido can be viewed according to the freudian pattern, it can also be desexualized and viewed as an undifferentiated energy that is at the basis of such mental processes as thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition. adj., adj libid´inal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

li·bi·do

(li-bē'dō, -bī'dō), Do not confuse this word with livedo.
1. Conscious or unconscious sexual desire.
2. Any passionate interest or form of life force.
3. In jungian psychology, synonymous with psychic energy.
[L. lust]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

libido

(lĭ-bē′dō, -bī′-)
n. pl. libi·dos
1. The psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctual biological drives.
2.
a. Sexual desire.
b. Manifestation of the sexual drive.

li·bid′i·nal (-bĭd′n-əl) adj.
li·bid′i·nal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

libido

Sigmund Freud’s term for one’s sex drive or sexual desire.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

libido

plural, libidos, sex drive Psychiatry Sexual drive, urge or desire; the psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctive biologic drives, generally equated to sexual drive; normal libido requires adequate testosterone and dopamine–which inhibits libido-attenuating prolactin. See Anorgasmia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

li·bi·do

(li-bē'dō)
1. Conscious or unconscious sexual desire.
2. Any passionate interest or form of life force.
3. In jungian psychology, synonymous with psychic energy.
[L. lust]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

libido

Sexual desire or its manifestations. In psychoanalytic theory, the term is used more generally to mean the psychic and emotional energy associated with instinctual biological drives.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about libido

Q. What are some ways to get an erection? Libido and sperm are OK. I have had a problem with depression for years. I have always had a strong libido and I find that my ED has been a factor in my depression. Sexual relationships have helped me deal with my depression. What a MIRACLE! How can something so good be a remedy for mental problems. Oh! for a good stiff dick. I have considered a penile prosthesis implant but I'm still hoping for something better. Any information that might help would be greatly appreciated and I will remember you in my dreams and fantasies(sexual)for you ladies and I'll thank you studs. John

A. I am a female but my husband likes to think about a womans vagina. So maybe you should get a fake vagina try Adameve.com. And also try lubricants and other things, think about what turns you on.

More discussions about libido
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The five most common health problems were included fatigue (49%), arthralgia and myalgia (46%), decreased libido (42%), insomnia (40%), and nervousness (39%).
triphasic OCs, which vary hormone levels and are thought to better mimic a woman's natural hormonal changes and result in fewer reports of decreased libido).
In women, hormonal problems associated with anovulation may be treated with progesterone whilst oestrogen therapy may help with the decreased libido associated with vaginal dryness and atrophy (Palmer 1999).
Some people may experience side effects associated with Megace ES that include impotence, passing gas, rash, high blood pressure, fever, decreased libido, insomnia, upset stomach, and elevated blood sugar.
Symptoms are different for each person but reduced self-esteem, disturbed sleep or appetite, decreased libido or reduced concentration are common.
In addition, some women experience decreased libido, moodiness, forgetfulness, hostility and depression.
Decreased libido or erectile dysfunction occurred most often with risperidone (26%, 23 of 89), followed by olanzapine (19%, 13 of 68), ziprasidone (17%, 3 of 18), quetiapine (9%, 5 of 54), aripiprazole (9%, 5 of 56), and clozapine (0 of 5).
For example, in one vignette about evaluating decreased libido, a physician becomes embarrassed when a patient demonstrates a sexual position.
When asked why this category should be ready to ignite now, Bagley acknowledges that the problems of decreased libido and sexual desire are not new, but the willingness to confront them openly has increased.
Although some people may have no symptoms, hypothyroidism, which affects more than 5 million Americans, may result in weight gain, dry hair and hair loss, headaches, loss of appetite, slow speech, infertility, respiratory infections, dry skin, weakness, cold intolerance, constipation, decreased libido, irritability, muscle cramps, constipation and/or memory loss.
However, current drug and surgical therapies for BPH are not completely effective, often having slow onset and with side effects ranging from decreased libido, sexual dysfunction and reduced quality of life to cardiovascular effects and/or surgical complications.
* Sexual side effects of menopause (vaginal dryness and decreased libido, for instance) are not top of mind, but they are part of a broader discussion of menopause.

Full browser ?