deciduous

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Related to Deciduous plants: Deciduous trees

deciduous

 [de-sid´u-us]
falling off; subject to being shed, such as deciduous (primary) teeth. See tooth.

de·cid·u·ous

(dē-sid'yū-ŭs),
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, often used to designate the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

/de·cid·u·ous/ (dĕ-sid´u-us) falling off or shed at maturity, as the teeth of the first dentition.

deciduous

(dĭ-sĭj′o͞o-əs)
adj.
Of or relating to the primary teeth.

de·cid′u·ous·ly adv.
de·cid′u·ous·ness n.

deciduous

[də·sid′yo̅o̅·əs]
Etymology: L, decidere, to fall off
falling off or shed at maturity.

de·cid·u·ous

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. dentistry Referring to the first or primary dentition.
See: deciduous tooth
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous

Shed or falling at a particular time or stage of growth. Sometimes applied to the primary teeth.

de·cid·u·ous

(D) (dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]

deciduous (dēsid´ūəs),

adj that which will be shed (exfoliated). Older term pertaining specifically to the first dentition. Preferred term is
primary.
deciduous dentition,
deciduous teeth,

deciduous

falling off; subject to being shed, as deciduous teeth.

deciduate, deciduous, decidual

characterized by shedding, e.g. teeth, placenta.

deciduate placenta, deciduate membrane
endothelial and hemochorial placentas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Proportional increase in evergreen and deciduous plants affected the compositions visually positive.
If a client wants backyard privacy all year long, it may be necessary to use a combination of evergreen and deciduous plants as well as hardscapes such as fences or overhead structures.
During the short northern growing season, evergreenness and wintergreenness allow plants to maintain photosynthesis during an extended period of time in autumn and resume photosynthesis earlier in spring than deciduous plants with a programmed phenology of leaf formation and loss the same year.
For most deciduous plants, the best time to prune in temperate climates is in the late dormant season.
Lilac, privet, barberry and other deciduous plants can be cut to within 12 to 18 inches of the ground.
Cutting back our deciduous plants once they have ''past their best'' is a subjective and often obsessive gardening activity.
The leaves of deciduous plants will have fallen off and the plants will not have started to form next year's leaf buds.
Both are framed by wide variety of evergreen and deciduous plants.
If that is sor ted you can move deciduous plants now, but evergreens tend to move best in September and April.
They take longer to root than softwood cuttings and are used for deciduous plants that root easily.
They take longer to root than softwood cuttings, so the cutting should be slightly longer, and are used for deciduous plants that root easily such as Salvia microphylla, hebe, deutzia, cornus, philadelphus and weigela.
Deciduous plants can be moved from mid-autumn to early spring, while evergreens are best moved in mid-autumn or early to mid-spring, so that the roots re-establish quickly.