deciduous

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deciduous

 [de-sid´u-us]
falling off; subject to being shed, such as deciduous (primary) teeth. See tooth.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·cid·u·ous

(dē-sid'yū-ŭs),
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, often used to designate the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deciduous

(dĭ-sĭj′o͞o-əs)
adj.
Of or relating to the primary teeth.

de·cid′u·ous·ly adv.
de·cid′u·ous·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

de·cid·u·ous

(dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. dentistry Referring to the first or primary dentition.
See: deciduous tooth
[L. deciduus, falling off]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

deciduous

Shed or falling at a particular time or stage of growth. Sometimes applied to the primary teeth.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

de·cid·u·ous

(D) (dĕ-sij'ū-ŭs)
1. Not permanent; denoting that which eventually falls off.
2. In dentistry, the first or primary dentition.
[L. deciduus, falling off]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
25): vines wind-dispersed by winged samaras, endemic to tropical deciduous forests in Oaxaca and Chiapas; morphologically isolated, unlike any species in Central America, presumably derived from an immigrant from South America (C.
temperate deciduous forest and 2) propose that these predators may influence voltinism (number of generations) in some lepidopteran species.
Temperate deciduous forest: Found primarily in the Northern Hemisphere, 75 to 225 cm of annual precipitation is seasonal; deciduous trees (hardwoods) dominate the vegetation in the fall, an autumn and spring understory of shrubbery and herbaceous plants becomes evident; the xeric end of the precipitation range produces what is termed chaparral or Mediterranean vegetation.
Venezuelan deciduous forests (VENEZUEL): Gentry (1982), Hueck (1978); 83 genera.
Tropical deciduous forest covers the greatest portion of the study area.
Ecological restoration of deciduous forest is grounded in community ecology theory and the processes of secondary succession (Young and others 2001).
11) found in extreme southeastern Nebraska and the Niobrara River valley, is the best example of a disjunct population isolated from its normal range, which is in the deciduous forests well to the south and east of Nebraska.
Examination of the position of the ellipses with regards to bird species location indicates that the pre-industrial landscape was strongly characterized by mature deciduous forest bird communities as shown by species such as Least Flycatcher and Veery at th e right end of the first axis (Fig.
One interesting feature of the fir and spruce forests of the Caucasus is the presence of an understory where typically boreal plants coexist with plants typical of deciduous forests, which is partly explained by the relatively high nutrient levels of the dark forest soils of the Caucasus, which favor the growth of deciduous woodland species that are very demanding in regard to nutrients.
The breeding bird assemblage of deciduous forest understory in southeastern Alaska and extreme western Canada, near the border of British Columbia and Yukon Territory, is generally more species rich than that of coniferous forest understory in the same region (see Willson and Comet 1996a, b).
"Since the USSR has over two-thirds of the world's deciduous forests, this is an enormous alternate wood source for the U.S.
Instead, they cut the deciduous forests for charcoal, which costs just $2 a bag and can last a family of four about two months.