decay

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decay

 [de-ka´]
1. the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter.
2. the process or stage of decline, as in old age.
tooth decay dental caries.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā'),
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
See also: memory.
2.
See also: memory. Synonym(s): putrefaction
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
See also: memory.
4. In dentistry, caries.
See also: memory.
5. psychology loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory.
6. Loss of radioactivity with time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

decay

(dĭ-kā′)
v. de·cayed, de·caying, de·cays
v.intr.
1. Biology To break down into component parts; rot.
2. Physics To disintegrate in a process of radioactive decay or particle decay.
3. Electronics To decrease gradually in magnitude. Used of voltage or current.
4. To decline in health or vigor; waste away.
n.
1.
a. The destruction or decomposition of organic matter as a result of bacterial or fungal action; rot.
b. Rotted matter.
2. Physics
a. See radioactive decay.
b. See particle decay.

de·cay′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

decay

Dentistry Caries, see there Medtalk Putrefaction, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
2. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
4. dentistry Caries.
5. psychology Loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory
6. Loss of radioactivity over time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
7. Synonym(s): disintegration.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

decay

see BIODEGRADATION.

decay

the decomposition of dead tissue, mainly by the action of fungi and bacteria.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. In dentistry, caries.
2. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
3. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
4. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about decay

Q. what would be the best way to protect my teeth from decaying?i fill pain always in my private parties,what prb whenever i take long with out sex,so i would like the advice from my fewwol

A. i fail to see the connection between teeth and groin pain...about the teeth. it's very very simple- get used to a healthy oral hygiene. brush your teeth in the right way twice a day for at least 6 minute. use floss. go to a dental hygienist, she'll guide you through it.

Q. Whether it`s possible for Bipolar disorder in children?

A. It is possible for children to suffer with bipolar disorder. It is a tricky diagnosis in children I would strongly suggest professional help when dealing with children with bipolar disorder.
I wouldnt trust the diagnosis of a GP, I would suggest getting a referal to a pediatric psychiatrist for a through evaluation and proper treatment

More discussions about decay
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References in periodicals archive ?
Asghar, "Aberrant expression of membrane cofactor protein and decay-accelerating factor in the endothelium of patients with systemic sclerosis: a possible mechanism of vascular damage," Laboratory Investigation, vol.
Prince, "A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis," Genes and Immunity, vol.
Imoto et al., "Associations between decay-accelerating factor polymorphisms and allergic respiratory diseases," Clinical and Experimental Allergy, vol.
Medof, "Heightened complement sensitivity of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome lymphocytes related to diminished expression of decay-accelerating factor," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Yuan et al., "Donor deficiency of decay-accelerating factor accelerates murine T cell-mediated cardiac allograft rejection," Journal of Immunology, vol.
Lin et al., "Decay-accelerating factor modulates induction of T cell immunity," Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.