debris

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debris

 [dĕ-bre´]
devitalized tissue or foreign matter.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·bris

(dĕ-brē'),
A useless accumulation of miscellaneous particles; waste in the form of fragments.
[Fr. débris, fr. O.Fr. desbrisier, to break apart, (fr. des- down, away + brisier to break) rubble, rubbish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

debris

also

débris

(də-brē′, dā-, dā′brē′)
n.
Biology The fragmented remains of dead or damaged cells or tissue.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

de·bris

(dĕ-brē')
A useless accumulation of miscellaneous particles; waste in the form of fragments.
[Fr. débris, fr. O.Fr. desbrisier, to break apart, (fr. des- down, away + brisier to break) rubble, rubbish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·bris

(dĕ-brē')
A useless accumulation of miscellaneous particles; waste in the form of fragments.
[Fr. débris, fr. O.Fr. desbrisier, to break apart, (fr. des- down, away + brisier to break) rubble, rubbish]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Without the political commitment to ban landmines, the world will not muster resources to finally clear Angolan fields of the debris of war. Without a political commitment to abolish nuclear weapons, to reject the notion that peace depends on the threat to destroy all that sustains life and peace, the nuclear states will continue to expend many more resources on maintenance of the nuclear threat than on its removal.
For "Richard III," the rose window gives way to a surrealistic expanse of what appears to be the debris of war. The costumes range from Edwardian to modern casual, and nothing detracts from the appeal of the Bard's delicious and masterful descent into villainy.
(Will the onset of glorious summer always be fraught with the psychic trauma that the news of her uncle's presumed death brought on an equally glorious day?) Or how does the disjunction between the ideals of war, which men declare, and its dirty reality, which women tend, sweeping away the debris of war, affect a child's psyche?
This is a charity which clears up the debris of war, such as landmines and unexploded bombs, to try to make former conflict zones safe for local people, and in particular for children.
The third category, sometimes referred to as 'Mounted War Trophies', were commercially made artefacts from the miscellaneous debris of war brought back as mementoes by returning soldiers.