death instinct

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Related to Death drive: death instinct

instinct

 [in´stinkt]
a complex of unlearned responses characteristic of a species. adj., adj instinc´tive.
death instinct Freud's concept of an unconscious drive toward dissolution and death, in opposition to the life instinct.
herd instinct the instinct or urge to be one of a group and to conform to its standards of conduct and opinion.
life instinct Freud's concept of all the constructive tendencies of the organism aimed at maintenance and perpetuation of the individual and species, in opposition to the death instinct.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

death in·stinct

an instinct of living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
Synonym(s): aggressive instinct
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

death instinct

n.
A primitive impulse for destruction, decay, and death, postulated by Sigmund Freud as coexisting with and opposing the life instinct. Also called Thanatos.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

death in·stinct

(deth in'stingkt)
The instinct of all living creatures toward self-destruction, death, or a return to the inorganic lifelessness from which they arose.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The instinct toward destruction or death drive is "no longer a debatable hypothesis" for Freud, Derrida argues in his rhetorical interpretation of Civilization and Its Discontents (henceforth CID) (10).
For Joanne Faulkner, life drive attempts to reduce tension by restraining and discharging energy while death drive increase tension in order for the organism to reach stability and inorganic state (162).
It evokes the Freudian death drive, which I will explore in the last section of this essay.
Although her blonde locks and saucer-like eyes suggest a conventional femininity, Hitchcock invests Marnie with a complicated personal and emotional history that reveals narcissistic and antisocial tendencies and, indeed, a dalliance with the death drive. Although a seemingly happy heterosexual relationship ensues by the narrative's close, we know that Marnie's queerness is not 'cured'.
Therefore, Heathcliff "anticipates the death drive, the desire to get beyond his romantic grief to some kind of 'real', pre- (or post-) linguistic connection with Catherine" (DeRosa 34).
Death Drive is about remarkable people, remarkable cars and remarkable circumstances and the car's role in creating some of the great celebrity myths.
Derived from his reading of Freud on the death drive, this account of Mrs.
In particular, Edelman's notions of queerness as pertaining to a rejection of (reproductive) futurity and an embrace of the death drive can help one to make a queer critique of Synge's play that still touches upon issues of reproduction and the body.
Graham Wolfe aborde un sujet plus sobre dans << Normand Chaurette's Fragments d'une lettre d'adieu lus par des geologues and the Zizekian Death Drive >>, ou il offre une lecture originale et subtile d'une piece signee par Chaurette en 1986 sur le deces d'un geologue au Cambodge en se servant du concept de << pulsion de mort >> de Slavoj Zizek.
(6.) Derrida defines Freud's death drive variously throughout Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, but simply stated: "...
As Lacan points out in Seminar VII, any 'will to destruction' in the death drive coexists with a 'will to make a fresh start,' a 'will for an Other-thing [Autre-chose] (Lacan, 1992, p.
In Archive Fever (1996), Derrida reconsiders Freud's thesis in Civilization and its Discontents (1930) that within the libido--the psychic drive that builds civilization through a desire to bring people together into cohesive units (the family, the city, the global community)--is a destructive impulse that he names the "death drive." Because the latter is linked to the former, as society advances and is increasingly able to fulfill human needs, it also becomes more violent and destructive.