alkylation

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al·kyl·a·tion

(al'ki-lā'shŭn),
Substitution of an alkyl radical for a hydrogen atom; for example, introduction of a side chain into an aromatic compound.

alkylation

/al·kyl·a·tion/ (al″kĭ-la´shun) the substitution of an alkyl group for an active hydrogen atom in an organic compound.

alkylation

a chemical reaction in which an alkyl group is transferred from an alkylating agent. When such organic reactions occur with a biologically significant cellular constituent such as deoxyribonucleic acid, they result in interference with mitosis and cell division.

al·kyl·a·tion

(al'ki-lā'shŭn)
Substitution of an alkyl radical for a hydrogen atom; e.g., introduction of a side chain into an aromatic compound.
References in periodicals archive ?
In environmental exposures, persons likely are exposed through food or water, which would mean that dealkylation and hydrolysis products might make up a larger percentage of the exposure.
Also, we need to include the mercapturates of the dealkylation products in our methodology to glean the full picture of ATZ metabolism.
The differences in product yields are too great to be explained by some certain reaction mechanism such as dealkylation, cyclization and dehydrogenation of volatile components or addition.
Previous reports have indicated that the dealkylation of Hg is a detoxification process that helps to protect the central nervous system (Magos 2003; Magos et al.
Methadone is extensively metabolized by hydroxylation and dealkylation of the nitrogen methyl groups; these dealkylated metabolites are unstable and spontaneously cyclize to form 2-ethylene1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), which may further N-demethylate (1).
Boron trihalide-methyl sulfide complexes as convenient reagents for dealkylation of aryl ethers.
Phase I enzymes such as those belonging to the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) family are involved in the initial oxidation, reduction, or dealkylation of carcinogens; this phase generally leads to the production of active intermediate metabolites.
Biotransformation of an organic molecule can occur through one or more of the following mechanisms: oxidation, oxidative dealkylation, decarboxylation, epoxidation, aromatic hydroxylation, aromatic nonheterocyclic ring cleavage, aromatic heterocyclic ring cleavage, hydrolysis, dehalogenation, and nitroreduction (12).
Presumably, these metabolites originate from side-chain transformations, such as dealkylation or hydroxylation, which do not affect their ultraviolet chromophores.