deaf culture

(redirected from Deaf pride)

deaf cul·ture

(def kŭl'chŭr)
Deafness perceived as a culture (rather than as a disability), which is characterized by having its own language, American Sign Language (ASL).
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there can be strong cohesion in the area of deaf pride, there is great diversity within the community related to communication, amplification, and surgical options.
The Deaf pride movement emanates from the Deaf community.
Cathy Young calls the Deaf Pride movement a "reductio ad absurdum" ("Sound Judgment," April).
Maybe the best way to learn something from the Deaf Pride movement is to see it as a reductio ad absurdum of modern identity politics," she writes.
There is some mention of sign language, but no reference to other positive characteristics of being deaf such as the Deaf community, Deaf culture, Deaf pride, Auslan and bilingualism.
To the question about whether cochlear implants take away "your Deaf pride," one respondent, Bill Boyle, noted, ".
Deaf children go to regular schools, mix with other students, have their own sign interpreters and learn about deaf pride.
Nevertheless, the fringe ideas of Deaf Pride have had consequences.
Perhaps the best way to learn something from the Deaf Pride movement is to see it as a reductio ad absurdum of modern identity politics.
23] Deaf pride advocates point out that as Deaf people they lack the ability to hear, but they also have many positive gains: a cohesive community, a rich cultural heritage built around the various residential schools, a growing body of drama, poetry, and other artistic traditions, and, of course, what makes all this possible, American Sign Language.