deafness

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deafness

 [def´nes]
hearing loss; lack or loss of all or a major part of the sense of hearing. For types, see under hearing loss.
Alexander's deafness congenital deafness due to cochlear aplasia involving chiefly the organ of Corti and adjacent ganglion cells of the basal coil of the cochlea; high-frequency hearing loss results.
central deafness that due to causes in the auditory pathways or in the brain; see hearing loss.
conduction deafness (conductive deafness) conductive hearing loss.
functional deafness functional hearing loss.
hysterical deafness functional hearing loss.
pagetoid deafness that occurring in osteitis deformans of the bones of the skull (paget's disease).
sensorineural deafness
1. that due to a defect in the inner ear or the acoustic nerve. See hearing loss.
word deafness auditory aphasia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

deaf·ness

(def'nes),
General term for inability to hear.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deaf·ness

(def'nĕs)
General term for loss of the ability to hear, without designation of the degree or cause of the loss.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

deafness

Partial or complete loss of hearing. Deafness may be conductive or sensorineural. Conductive deafness results from disorders of the external ear, eardrum, middle ear and acoustical link to the inner ear; sensorineural (nerve deafness) results form disorders in the inner ear-the cochlea or acoustic nerve.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

deaf·ness

(def'nĕs)
General term for inability to hear.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about deafness

Q. what is this immediate hearing loss???? I woke up yesterday and didnt hear anything, only very high tones in my left ear. I also feel nausious and dizzy. please tell me someone has experienced it and it goes away in a few days!!! I'm very scared to loose my hearing forever, it's been 24 hours that I'm almost deaf. thank you

A. Acute hearing loss can be caused due to an infection of the middle ear or internal ear that can cause dizziness nausea fever and vomiting as well. You should see a doctor for proper diagnosis and treatment.

More discussions about deafness
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References in periodicals archive ?
For those interested in deaf history or the study of marginalized groups, this reader is a wonderful source.
As Catherine Kudlick noted in a recent review of the field of disability history (of which deaf history is sometimes understood as a subgenre and sometimes as a competing field), exploration of race and gender has been problematically sacrificed by scholars of deaf history in order that its coherency be maintained.
Mr Hay, who lives in Wolverhampton, has researched deaf history and the development of British Sign Language and has also brought together several objects to illustrate the development of deaf education.
They should because the two actual problems of our deaf children and youth at schools around the country are: (1) communication barriers to information and knowledge on any subject, including deaf history, and (2) the lack of deaf role models as librarians or other related professionals in the library.
Cedric Moon British Deaf History Society, Whitchurch, Cardiff
Curators, historians, scholars of museology, and others discuss classical portraiture as reconstructive narrative, ghosts in the war museum, reflections on representing experiences of mental illness in museums, the red wheelchair in the white snowdrift, disability perspectives and the museum, and the Norwegian Museum of Deaf History and Culture.
Cedric Moon British Deaf History Society READING recent letters in Viewpoints, I would like to add that the number of American artists who appeared at Cardiff's Sophia Gardens Pavilion during the early 1960s reads like a who's who of popular music!
Gannon (Curator of the History Through Deaf Eyes exhibition), and Jean Lindquist Borgey (Director of the History Through Deaf Eyes Project, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC), "Through Deaf Eyes: A Photographic History Of An American Community" is the companion volume to an acclaimed PBS television documentary based on a landmark photographic exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution in 2001 celebrating almost 200 years of United States Deaf History. The deaf have been a cultural and linguistic minority in America almost from its inception.
When the centre opens it will include a specially built theatre and library and provide access to deaf history, art, photography and community groups for the deaf.
Scholars in Deaf history offer one approach to this issue by examining the community through a cultural lens rather than a medical or pathological interpretation.
At almost all of the colleges and universities that offer allied health and counseling programs, cross-curriculum electives generally include Deaf studies where students learn about Deaf theater, Deaf poetry, Deaf history, American Sign Language, and other topics related to Deaf culture.
A fair chance in the race of life; the role of Gallaudet University in deaf history.

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