sign language

(redirected from Deaf Sign Language)
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sign language

Etymology: L, signum + lingua, tongue
a form of communication often used with and among deaf people, consisting of hand and body movements. Many variations exist, including American Sign Language (ASL). Other forms of manual communication are Signed English and finger spelling. Compare body language.

sign language

A formal language of nonverbal communication based on hand shapes and gestures, facial expressions and movements.

sign language

Audiology A formal language of nonverbal communication based on hand shapes, facial expressions, and movements. See Americans with Disabilities Act.

sign lan·guage

(sīn lang'gwăj)
A system of manual communication used by the deaf. True sign languages such as American Sign Language (ASL) have a complete representation of morphology, semantics, and syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
172) The linguistic minority approach has two obstacles blocking full accessibility for Deaf sign language users.
Perhaps because of the "muddy" -- to use a term suggested to me by Pieter Muysken -- nature of the creole data, attention has shifted more recently to another kind of language where there may be more cogent evidence for creation anew, namely deaf sign languages.
With less than 200 qualified British Sign Language interpreters on the nationally approved register, the UK's 70,000 deaf sign language users can wait up to two weeks for an interpreter, who charge for a minimum period of three hours at between GBP 90-GBP 150 per session, plus expenses.