sign language

(redirected from Deaf Sign Language)
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sign language

Etymology: L, signum + lingua, tongue
a form of communication often used with and among deaf people, consisting of hand and body movements. Many variations exist, including American Sign Language (ASL). Other forms of manual communication are Signed English and finger spelling. Compare body language.

sign language

A formal language of nonverbal communication based on hand shapes and gestures, facial expressions and movements.

sign language

Audiology A formal language of nonverbal communication based on hand shapes, facial expressions, and movements. See Americans with Disabilities Act.

sign lan·guage

(sīn lang'gwăj)
A system of manual communication used by the deaf. True sign languages such as American Sign Language (ASL) have a complete representation of morphology, semantics, and syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
With respect to deaf sign language users' involvement in the legal system, studies have confirmed similar findings to those above (Brennan, 1999; Brennan & Brown, 1997; Russell, 2002).
There was a need to identify the current status of provision and training for the deaf sign language users in order to develop standards for legal SLI provision across Europe, to align with the European Directive on the rights to interpretation and translation in criminal proceedings and provide access to justice for deaf sign language users in range of legal settings.
In order to gain a snapshot of whether SLI provision may be meeting the needs of deaf sign language users in legal settings across Europe, it was important to get a sense of the general population and ratio of deaf people to interpreters.
For Deaf sign language users, the key component of access is the availability of sign language interpreters.
Creation of a lexicon is, however, possible, since deaf sign languages have lexicons that are in some cases of demonstrably recent origins; they may, however, have been created by stimulus diffusion.
In particular, with respect to doing research with signing communities, this means involving deaf sign language users at all stages of the research process.
Sign language interpreter quality: the perspective of deaf sign language users in the Netherlands.