Davis


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Davis

 [da´vis]
Mary E. P. (1858–1924). Nursing educator and organizer and one of the founders of the American Journal of Nursing. She helped found the American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools for Nurses (later the League of Nursing Education), which became part of the National League for Nursing. She was a strong advocate of the development of nursing education, with its own theory and curriculum.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
David M., 20th-century U.S. urologist.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
John Staige, U.S. surgeon, 1872-1946. See: Davis graft, Crowe-Davis mouth gag.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
Hallowell, U.S. physiologist, 1896-1992. See: Davis battery model of transduction.
References in classic literature ?
I just guess you ain't goin' to do anything of the sort," the stage-hand assured Davis.
I'll pay it gladly," Davis said, again lifting the iron bar.
The manager looked to Davis and shrugged his shoulders helplessly.
Well," Davis gave in, turning on his heel, "they can make fools of themselves over dogs, them that wants to.
But from the top of the staircase to the bottom, everything changed for Davis.
Davis started his book-writing career critiquing Los Angeles in works like City of Quartz and Ecology of Fear, but in recent years he has branched out.
The son of former Harlem Globetrotter, Mel Davis, Hubert Davis chronicles his father's life as a basketball player, and as the father of himself and his half-brother in Chicago, where the elder Davis was married to a black woman before returning years later to Vancouver to be with Hubert's white mother.
That means the end product RPEI is making is usually not its own, if only because the grinders are working so far from home and it can he difficult to find a local market for the material, says Davis.
Because he didn't have a non-compete agreement with his former employer, Davis was free to court customers with whom he was already working.
At any performance of the African American Dance Ensemble, artistic director, Chuck Davis, a supertall, joyous presence in vivid robes, entices you into the experience of the bantaba.
Through critical reflection on a series of books written during the course of twenty-one years, Davis discusses the progress of American Jews and the legacy of the Atlantic slave trade.