data mining

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data mining

The process of exploring and analysing databases to find previously unidentified patterns of data—popularly known as “hidden data”—which can be exploited for various purposes and produce new insights on outcomes, alternative treatments or effects of treatment on different populations.

mining

(mi'ning) [ME]
1. The extraction of useful information from a database. Synonym: data mining
2. The extraction from the earth of materials with industrial value, such as coal, silver, or gold. Miners are exposed to various occupational disorders, including respiratory diseases (e.g., pneumoconiosis), allergies, and traumatic injuries.

data mining

Mining (1).
References in periodicals archive ?
Those savings represent a return of $23 for every dollar spent on the data-mining program, Gould told the panel.
Congress gave RMA five years' worth of funding for the data-mining program beginning in 2000, funding that expired in 2005 and since has been extended via an annual appropriation.
* a visual editor allowing the drawing of the flow of a data-mining process intuitively.
We will briefly review the data-mining process, report on a survey of data-mining practices among Fortune 500 companies, and provide an example of a data-mining task.
Figure 1 shows an overview of the data-mining process.
A data-mining approach to spacer oligonucleotide typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Law enforcement agencies can consider exploring the use of data-mining applications to assist them in a variety of areas.
Opposition to government data-mining efforts related to terrorism in February 2003 led the Secretary of Defense to appoint the Technology and Privacy Advisory Committee (TAPAC) to look at Defense Department data-mining efforts.
The GAO reports that current federal data-mining efforts that are taking place with little, if any, oversight from Congress or the public include:
A key component of the TIA project is focused on developing "data-mining" tools to sort through the massive amounts of information to find suspicious patterns and associations.
Despite the diversity of opinions about the new technology, several insurance companies are finding success with their data-warehousing systems and their related data-mining tools.
Such trends are prompting researchers to explore more sophisticated data-mining technologies.