Darwinism

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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.
The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Memoriam reflects Tennyson's significant departures from Darwinistic evolutionary thought.
Kevin Gaines has described civilizationism as a sociological theory rooted in the Darwinistic milieu of the early twentieth century.
A return to these conditions, he says, could lead to "a Darwinistic survival-of-the-fittest atmosphere.
Tangentially, the act of design produces its own form of Darwinistic evolution.
Second, all of them had lived in close contact, some for many years, with human beings whose daily existence was imperiled by the social Darwinistic effects of the Industrial Revolution.
What results is a Darwinistic effect where a venture capitalist gambles small amounts on many ventures up front, and then winnows out the losers until only the winners are left.
This Darwinistic selection starts in the subway, where "the struggle for the anorexic streamlining of the species" (my translation) is waged on a daily basis.
This exchange--of freedom for imprisonment, of starvation for nurturance--speaks to the nature of society from a perspective that sees culture as operating on a Darwinistic model of survival.
These attitudes are undoubtedly rooted in an elitist, Darwinistic perspective that regards expressive forms sanctioned by middle and upper socioeconomic classes as superior, and those associated with lower socioeconomic classes inferior.
One of the fiercest criticisms leveled at the neoliberalism that has characterized economic activity at the end of the century takes direct aim at its Darwinistic underpinnings.
Some Darwinistic selection processes, for example, reinforce a dominant theme while eradicating its alternatives (Miller 1999).
I have some sympathy for Darwinistic explanations of our moral (and other) senses, but believe that these are compatible with there also being true claims in morality (as well as in science and history).