Darwinism


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darwinism

 [dar´wĭ-nizm]
the theory of evolution stating that change in a species over time is partly the result of a process of natural selection, which enables the species to continually adapt to its changing environment.

Darwinism

(där′wĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of biological evolution developed by Charles Darwin and others, stating that all species of organisms have developed from other species, primarily through natural selection. Also called Darwinian theory.

Dar′win·ist n.
Dar′win·is′tic adj.
The current paradigm of evolution, which holds that cumulative changes in successive generations of organisms—i.e., evolution of species—results from mutation and natural selection of the organisms that are best adapted phenotypically to survive in an environment—i.e., ‘survival of the fittest’

Darwinism

the theory of evolution formulated by Charles DARWIN that holds that different species of plants and animals have arisen by a process of slow and gradual changes over successive generations, brought about by NATURAL SELECTION. The essential points of Darwin's theory are:
  1. in organisms that reproduce sexually there is a wide range of variability, both within and between species.
  2. all living forms have the potential for a rapid rise in numbers, increasing at a geometric rate.
  3. the fact that populations usually remain within a limited size must indicate a ‘struggle for existence’ in which those individuals unsuited to the particular conditions operating at that time are eliminated or fail to breed as successfully as others (see FITNESS).
  4. the struggle for existence results in natural selection that favours the survival of the best-adapted individuals, a process described by Herbert Spencer (1820–93) in his Principles of Biology (1865) as the ‘survival of the fittest’.
References in periodicals archive ?
They see that influence exemplified in the influence of Newtonian ideas on Darwin himself, in the influence of statistical physics on the between - the - wars synthesis of Darwinism with genetics, and in the alleged "complexity revolution" on tomorrow's Darwinism.
But alas, Dennett protests, Darwinism teaches us that skyhooks are mythological.
To his credit, Ruse occasionally recognizes that both Christianity and Darwinism are complex fields of thought: "It is important to stress these ambiguities in the Christian position, because they are echoed in Darwinism and in the literary responses and interpretations" (p.
The study also aims at discussing anti Darwinism in the play and attempts to show that Shaw was on the side of Lamarck.
This alternative approach is elaborated in Willa Gather's prairie novels, especially My Antonia (1918) and One of Ours (1922), which fashion Darwinism's account of sexual selection into the basis of a feminist politics that rejects traditional sex roles, biological determinism, natural hierarchies, and heterosexism.
Nietzsche had a curious attitude toward Darwinism. He took seriously the fact that Darwinism omitted conventional morality, a circumstance that may partly have engendered the violent criticism against Darwin upon publication of On the Origin of Species.
In section 2, I will inquire into the position of individual entities (organisms) if comprehensive Darwinism is accepted.
Similar to the beliefs expressed by fundamentalist Christians, Muslim opponents to Darwinism maintain that Allah created the world, mankind and all known species in a single act.
A CLASSICAL composer from Cardiff has released the first volume of a decade's work - based on the workings of bee societies, the natural world and Darwinism.
Reading human nature; literary Darwinism in theory and practice.
Along the way contributors touch briefly but competently on other specific topics such as miracles, social Darwinism, and some implications of sociobiology.
Focusing on the importance of the issue to education in the sciences and humanities, especially America's public schools, she examines Darwinism and the neo-Darwinian revolution and applications of Darwin's theories in the social Darwinism and eugenics movements; theistic approaches to evolution; arguments for and responses to creationism and intelligent design; religion, science, the American courts, and key trials; and public schools and religion.