darwinian

(redirected from Darwinians)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

dar·win·i·an

(dar-win'ē-ăn),
Relating to or ascribed to Charles Darwin.

darwinian

dar·win·i·an

(dahr-win'ē-ăn)
Relating to or ascribed to Charles Darwin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ruse shows that contrary to what many think, including the opinions of the leading historians of the era, the Darwinian revolution was not only scientific, but also religious or metaphysical.
Balfour offered a similar critique of Darwinian and other materialistic accounts of human morality, which he thought destroyed morality by depicting it as the product of processes that are essentially non-moral.
For example, the extent to which Teilhard "accepts" the Darwinian understanding of evolution (p.
He begins by stating that evolution "could not help but undermine many of the core beliefs of a predominantly Anglican society," and that "it was not uncommon for someone who accepted Darwinian evolution to experience a profound crisis of faith" (pp.
FPP's attack on Darwinian theory unfolds in two parts.
Beginning with historical background (chapter 1), he establishes the core "fact of evolution" (chapter 2), and proceeds with chapter-length accounts of the sorts of problems that test the limits of Darwinian theory: the origin of life, the path of evolution, the cause of evolution, and human nature.
Can Darwinians even begin to explain why that "atomistic individualism" emerged, much less say anything certain about its limits?
In what is becoming the standard Intelligent Design rhetorical tactic, Olasky and Perry reverse all the polarities that superficially governed the Scopes debate: The rigid orthodoxy is now the Darwinian establishment, the object of blind faith is now the unproven theory of evolution, and the enemies of open skeptical inquiry are the politically correct enforcers of materialist dogma in the nation's public schools.
Although a frequent critic of President Bush, I think he as correct to say that intelligent design theory deserves a mention in science classrooms alongside Darwinian evolution.
Hogan critically examines several varieties of scientism, be ginning with the "humanistic religion" of Darwinian evolution.
We could label it "self-immolation behavior" and wonder how Darwinian natural selection could possibly favor it.
Of course a Darwinian can be a Christian, since there is nothing in the Christian faith that demands a belief in the "intelligent design" of life forms.