natural selection

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nat·u·ral se·lec·tion

"survival of the fittest," the principle that in nature those individuals best able to adapt to their environment will survive and reproduce, whereas those less able will die without progeny, and the genes carried by the survivors will increase in frequency. This principle is heuristic rather than rigorous because it cannot be tested, the outcome being tautologous with the empiric definition of fitness.

natural selection

n.
The process in nature by which, according to Darwin's theory of evolution, organisms that are better adapted to their environment tend to survive longer and transmit more of their genetic characteristics to succeeding generations than do those that are less well adapted.

natural selection

A general term for a shift in the frequency of a gene’s allelic variants within a population over time, which reflects the differential reproductive success of individual genotypes.

nat·u·ral se·lec·tion

(nă-chŭr'ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
Colloquially, "survival of the fittest," the principle that in nature those individuals best able to adapt to their environment will survive and reproduce, whereas those less able will die without progeny, and the genes carried by the survivors will increase in frequency. This principle is heuristic rather than rigorous because it cannot be tested, the outcome being tautologous with the empiric definition of fitness.

natural selection

The Darwin-originated principle that individuals of a species happening, by normal genetic rearrangement or by mutation, to possess inherited characteristics with survival value relative to a particular environment are more likely to survive long enough to reproduce and increase the numbers having these characteristics. Natural selection occurs quickly in rapidly reproducing micro-organisms. (Charles Darwin, 1809–82, English naturalist).

natural selection

the mechanism, proposed by Charles DARWIN, by which gradual evolutionary changes take place. Organisms which are better adapted to the environment in which they live produce more viable young, so increasing their proportion in the population; thus particular characteristics are ‘selected’ and others are lost. Such a mechanism depends on the variability of individuals within the population. Such variability arises through MUTATION and other genetic events, the beneficial variants being preserved by NATURAL SELECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hartl (Harvard U.) and Clark (Cornell U.) strive for a balance between theory and empirical observation in chapters discussing genetic and phenotypic variation; organization of genetic variation; random genetic drift; mutation and the neutral theory; Darwinian selection; inbreeding, population subdivision, and migration; molecular population genetics; evolutionary quantitative genetics; population genomics; and human population genetics.
We should also expect that these nonfactual beliefs will evolve over generations, either by random drift or following some sort of analogue of Darwinian selection, eventually showing a pattern of significant divergence from common ancestry, Languages drift apart from a common parent given sufficient time in geographical separation.
The most capable and best managed small high-tech firms in Russia are surviving a Darwinian selection out of the rather large number that earlier jumped on the new bandwagon without proper preparation or realistic expectations.
In the walls of the seminary a Darwinian selection process of sorts took place with only the--physically and psychologically, not necessarily intellectually--fittest graduating.
A Darwinian selection process must take place away from ideological pushes, the author argues, in the hope that viable technologies will last.
This is not ordinary Darwinian selection but it is a kind of high-level analogy of Darwinian selection.