Darwin's finches


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Darwin's finches

a group of finches that occurs on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific. The islands are oceanic and were colonized by an ancestral type which has speciated and provides an excellent example of ADAPTIVE RADIATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
This larger of Darwin's finches had a different song than the three native finches on the island.
The finding may help explain how Darwin's finches evolved into 18 species in an evolutionarily speedy 1 million to 2 million years.
Darwin's finches have long been considered a model population for study of adaptive radiation, speciation, and population biology.
Indeed, readers are reminded that although "Darwin's finches" are the archipelago's iconic birds, one can distinguish many of the islands by other animals as well (e.g., mockingbirds, iguanas, lizards, tortoises, and many plants).
Drs Peter and Rosemary Grant were awarded the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences for their research of evolution in Darwin's Finches. While the subjects of their experiments and the environment in which they performed their study were significant enablers, a more significant element was the circumstances that enabled them to work together, combined with excellent experimental design.
FOR those viewers silly enough to miss last week's series opener, more fool you, for host Jimmy Doherty took a fascinating look at Darwin's Finches and Dippy the Diplodocus in his examination of some of the more intriguing artefacts at London's Natural History Museum.
Some of the well-known species include the land iguana, flightless cormorants, blue footed boobies - a bird - and Darwin's finches.
One of the most frequently used examples is that of Darwin's finches. The argument runs like this:
Rosemary Grant and Peter Grant will discuss "Evolution of Darwin's Finches," focusing on their work on evolution and the finches in the Galapagos Islands.
Chances are, it wasn't from reading about Darwin's finches or his box.
Science is evolution's worst enemy because in the past 10 years it has demolished all the old evolutionary "proofs" such as the peppered moth, Darwin's finches, archaeopteryx and many others.
The Galapagos have some fantastic, unique bird species that are a keystone of evolutionary biology, such as Darwin's finches. Also at risk are the flightless cormorants and Galapagos penguins.