Darwin's finches


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Darwin's finches

a group of finches that occurs on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific. The islands are oceanic and were colonized by an ancestral type which has speciated and provides an excellent example of ADAPTIVE RADIATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
In that case, the Archaeopteryx fossils could represent a species flock, a Jurassic analog of Darwin's finches.
This larger of Darwin's finches had a different song than the three native finches on the island.
The finding may help explain how Darwin's finches evolved into 18 species in an evolutionarily speedy 1 million to 2 million years.
Darwin's finches have long been considered a model population for study of adaptive radiation, speciation, and population biology.
Some of the well-known species include the land iguana, flightless cormorants, blue footed boobies - a bird - and Darwin's finches.
One of the most frequently used examples is that of Darwin's finches.
Rosemary Grant and Peter Grant will discuss "Evolution of Darwin's Finches," focusing on their work on evolution and the finches in the Galapagos Islands.
Chances are, it wasn't from reading about Darwin's finches or his box.
Science is evolution's worst enemy because in the past 10 years it has demolished all the old evolutionary "proofs" such as the peppered moth, Darwin's finches, archaeopteryx and many others.
The Galapagos have some fantastic, unique bird species that are a keystone of evolutionary biology, such as Darwin's finches.
The cactus finch, one of 13 closely related Darwin's finches unique to the Galapagos, has a specially adapted beak, sturdy enough to open a hole in the side of the tough fruit.