Darwin's finches

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Darwin's finches

a group of finches that occurs on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific. The islands are oceanic and were colonized by an ancestral type which has speciated and provides an excellent example of ADAPTIVE RADIATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Big Bird population belongs to a group of finch species are collectively known as Darwin's finches and helped Darwin to uncover the process of evolution by natural selection
But when it blooms, the cactus lures pollinators, such as this Darwin's finch and carpenter bee (above), to feed on nectar from its flowers.
Fitness of 1987 cohorts of Darwin's Finches (over four years).
High survival of Darwin's finch hybrids: Effect of beak morphology and diets.
Darwin's finch songs are transmitted culturally and not genetically from one generation to the next and remain unaltered for life (Grant and Grant 1989).
In this paper we illustrate its empirical potential with the results of a study of microevolution in Darwin's finches on the Galapagos island of Daphne Major.
Preliminary estimates of the effects of Darwin's finch hybridization on phenotypic and genetic variances were made by Grant and Price (1981); Price et al.
The 13 Galapagos species of Darwin's Finches manifest various degrees of evolution upon their beak, having different shapes and sizes for each species in order to gobble different types of foods (hence evolution):
Natural selection can sometimes work one gene at time, a new study of Darwin's finches suggests.
40 Years of Evolution: Darwin's Finches on Daphne Major Island
During and after completing his undergraduate degree in 1933, he took part in several ornithological expeditions; he became a schoolmaster; he next enjoyed a career-changing four months on the Galapagos Islands in 1938-1939, writing a much-quoted book on Darwin's Finches from his work there.
Another example are Darwin's finches, whose beaks evolved over millions of years with changes in birdsong, an important mating signal, and thus contributed to the rise of new and distinct finch species.