dandelion

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dandelion

/dan·de·li·on/ (dan´dĕ-li″on) a weedy herb, Taraxacum officinale, having deeply notched leaves and brilliant yellow flowers; used for dyspepsia, loss of appetite, urinary tract infections, and liver and gallbladder complaints.

dandelion

A perennial herb containing inulin, bitter principles and sesquiterpenes; the roots are rich in vitamins A and C. Chinese and Western herbalists use two different species for different indications.
 
Chinese herbal medicine
The entire plant has been used as an antidote, an anti-inflammatory, to dissolve blood clots, reduce swelling and promote internal secretions; dandelions have also been used for breast disease and poor lactation, colitis, food poisoning, hepatitis and other liver diseases, gallstones, kidney stones, ocular pain and swelling, snakebites, tuberculosis and urinary burning.

Flower essence therapy
An essence which is believed to provide dynamic energy and promote inner peace.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, dandelion root is a diuretic, laxative and tonic, and has been used for poor digestion, gallbladder disease, hepatitis and other liver diseases, congestive heart failure, hypertension, menstrual pain, premenstrual syndrome and arthritic pain.

dandelion,

n Latin names:
Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum laevigatum; parts used: buds, leaves, roots; uses: laxative, antihypertensive, diuretic, (under research: antitumor, immunogenic, colon disease, urolithiasis); precautions: pregnancy, lactation, those allergic to chamomile or yarrow root, patients with diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, stomach disorders, bile duct blockage, intestinal blockage, latex allergy; can cause nausea, cholelithiasis, gallbladder infection, contact dermatitis. Also called
blowball, cankerwort, lion's tooth, priest's crown, puffball, swine snout, white endive, and
wild endive.

dandelion

References in periodicals archive ?
Nettles, dandelion greens, ginger and burdock root are four herbs that can also be eaten; try them in a saute for a delicious meal
Dandelion greens are edible when young early in the season before the plants flower, but mature leaves are very bitter.
Fresh greens, including watercress, dandelion greens and seaweed, plus low fat milk and yoghurt, fortified juice, cereals, and sardines with bones are rich in calcium.
1/3 cup olive oil 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar Salt and pepper to taste 4 small beets, stems trimmed 1/2 pound fresh dandelion greens 1/2 small head curly endive, stem ends trimmed 2 large fresh tomatoes 3 tablespoons drained capers 2 hard-boiled eggs, coarsely chopped
Some vegetables are good sources of calcium: collard greens (1 cup, 289 mg), turnip greens (1 cup, 252 mg), dandelion greens (1 cup, 252 mg), mustard greens (1 cup, 193 mg), bokchoy/kale (1 cup, 147 mg), Brussels sprouts (1 cup, 144 mg),and broccoli (1 cup, 138 mg).
Jane spent a morning picking dandelion greens with Mabelle, our ninety-year-old cousin, then stewed the greens up with salt pork according to practice, as she made red flannel hash out of leftover boiled dinner, grinding up beets to make the redness according to practice.
My father used to tell me how, back in Montreal, his family would gather young dandelion greens for salad in spring, and roast and grind the roots as a coffee stretcher or (during the war) substitute.
Around their kitchen table at the end of a long day, we savored our friendship along with mouth-watering meals featuring milkweed tops, fiddleheads, dandelion greens, and wild-berry pies.
Spinach, collards, kale, dandelion greens, mustard greens, and Swiss chard are the decathletes of the vegetable kingdom.
Is spinach a good source of iron, and Swiss chard and dandelion greens good sources of calcium?
Lutein and zeaxanthin: Dark green leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, turnip greens, collards, dandelion greens, mustard greens), summer squash, peas, pumpkin and winter squash, Brussels sprouts
TOP 20 POWERHOUSE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Watercress Turnip greens Chinese cabbage Mustard greens Chard Endive Beet greens Chives Spinach Kale Chicory Dandelion greens Leaf lettuce Red pepper Parsley Aruguia Romaine lettuce Broccoli Collard greens Pumpkin