danazol


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danazol

 [dan´ah-zol]
a synthetic androgen that suppresses the ovarian-pituitary axis by inhibiting the release of gonadotropins from the pituitary gland; administered orally for treatment of endometriosis, fibrocystic disease of the breast, hereditary angioedema, and gynecomastia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

da·na·zol

(dā'nă-zol),
A synthetic steroid used to treat endometriosis, fibrocystic breast disease, and angioedema. Indirectly reduces estrogen production by lowering levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

danazol

Endocrinology A non-virilizing anabolic androgen used to manage HANE, fibrocystic breast disease, endometriosis, and possibly autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but may mediate immune thrombocytopenia Adverse effects Weight gain, edema, acne, hirsutism, deepening of voice, clitorimegaly, menometrorrhagia, ↓ HDL-C, ↑ liver enzymes, peliosis hepatis, benign intracranial HTN. See Hereditary angioneurotic edema.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

da·na·zol

(dā'nă-zol)
A synthetic steroid used to treat endometriosis, fibrocystic breast disease, and angioedema. Indirectly reduces estrogen production by lowering levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

da·na·zol

(dā'nă-zol)
A synthetic steroid used to treat endometriosis, fibrocystic breast disease, and angioedema.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Danazol is very effective in reducing breast pain symptoms (by 80%), with a higher relapse after stopping the medication.
-Danazol: Low-dose danazol therapy at luteal phase is effective in reducing the sensitivity of the breasts.
Attenuated androgens (danazol, stanozolol, and oxandrolone) are considered effective drugs for long-term prophylaxis because they result in an increase in C1-INH and C4 levels reducing the frequency of attacks.
Low-dose danazol after combined surgical and medical therapy reduces the incidence of pelvic pain in women with moderate and severe endometriosis.
[17] Further reports from the same group described the use of danazol in dosages from 100 to 400 mg per day for 3-6 months in over 300 women with varying types of benign breast disease and reported total resolution of pain and nodularity in about 80% of patients.
After further consultation with the immunology team, the Sustanon was replaced by 200 mg danazol daily from day 43 due to improved safety in SLE.
The effect of danazol on menorrhagia, coagulation mechanisms, haematological indices and body weight.
Progesterone, oral contraceptives, and danazol, which are used to treat endometriosis, may be partially ameliorated (7).
Examples include naproxen, nifedipine, danazol, griseofulvin, phenytoin, indomethacin, aluminium oxide, titanium oxide, lithium carbonate and iron phosphate.
Patients in the treatment group were treated with BSHXP (Table 3), while patients in the control group were administered with Western medicine, including mifepristone, Diphereline, gestrinone, and danazol. Treatment duration was 3 or 6 months.
After this unsuccessful therapy, we used danazol, a weak androgen that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of immune and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and in thrombocytopenia in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome [10,11].