tribology

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tri·bol·o·gy

(tri-bol'ŏ-jē),
The study of friction and its effects in biologic systems, especially in regard to articulated surfaces of the skeleton.
[G. tribō, to rub, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tribology

(trĭ-bŏl′ō-jē)
The study of the effect of friction on the body, esp. the articulating joints.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
A method of estimating wind turbine blade fatigue life and damage using continuum damage mechanics, International Journal of Damage Mechanics 21(6): 810-821.
Based on the theory of continuum mechanics and irreversible thermodynamics, macro damage mechanics (CDM) assumes that the media, which contains various defects and structures, is a continuum.
Taken from papers presented at the international conference "Advances in fracture and damage mechanics XII" held in September 2013 in Sardinia, Italy, representatives of nineteen countries offer the latest theoretical, computation, and experimental research on fracture and damage mechanics as well as materials' structural integrity and durability.
Plumtree, "A fatigue damage accumulation model based on continuum damage mechanics and ductility exhaustion," International Journal of Fatigue, vol.
Desmorat, Engineering Damage Mechanics, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2005.
Continuous damage mechanics, originated by Kachanov [27] in 1958, describes the influence of microstructural changes in the mechanical response of solids.
Damage evolution of rock is an important issue in the study of rock mass damage mechanics [5-9].
Sethuraman, "A continuum damage mechanics model for ductile fracture," International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping, vol.
By taking into account material degradation instead of one single major crack, continuum damage mechanics provides a sophisticated framework for the fatigue crack initiation analysis of metallic materials [1], while the fracture mechanics-based models are dominated approaches in simulating fatigue crack growth [2].
From the perspective of damage mechanics, the nonlinearity of the stress-strain relationships of rock and concrete is due to the formation and propagation of microcracks in the materials through load-induced continuous damage.
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