dalton

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dalton

 (D) (Da) [dawl´ton]
an arbitrary unit of mass, being ¹⁄₁₂ the mass of the nuclide of carbon-12, equivalent to 1.657 × 10−24 g. Called also atomic mass unit.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Dal·ton

(dawl'tŏn),
John, English chemist, mathematician, and natural philosopher, 1766-1844. See: Dalton law, Dalton-Henry law, daltonian, daltonism.

dal·ton (Da),

(dawl'tŏn),
Term used to indicate a unit of mass equal to 1/12 the mass of a carbon-12 atom, 1.0000 in the atomic mass scale; numerically, but not dimensionally, equal to molecular or particle weight (atomic mass units).
[John Dalton]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Dalton

A unit of mass regarded as identical to u (unified atomic mass unit), which is not accepted as standard nomenclature by the IUPAC or IUPAP, equal in mass to 1/12 the mass of a 12C atom. Mass is typically expressed by biologists as kilodaltons (kDa), a unit that  sometimes appears as the label on the x-axis of a mass spectrum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dal·ton

(Da, D) (dawl'tŏn)
Term unofficially used to indicate a unit of mass equal to 1/12 the mass of a carbon-12 atom, 1.0000 in the atomic mass scale; numerically, but not dimensionally, equal to molecular or particle weight (atomic mass units).
[John Dalton]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dalton

a unit of mass: 1 dalton is equal to 1 atomic mass unit. Molecular weight is often expressed in daltons. The unit is named after John Dalton, who developed the atomic theory of matter.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Dalton received phone calls from doctors who were excited by the progress they were seeing in patients' lab results due to their weight loss.
"Once their bodies switch over to a fat-burning mode, you can hear the increased energy in their voices," Dalton notes.
Over 50% of the patients who joined the program were not originally customers of Dalton's pharmacy.
Killing Mary Dalton and successfully extorting money from her wealthy parents provides him with deep psychological satisfactions because, like Loeb, he experiences criminal action as a mode of "revolt" against a "basic feeling of inferiority."
Significantly, when Wright describes peculiarly modern problems in "How 'Bigger' Was Born," he employs language that vividly recalls the rhetoric used to describe the killings of Bobby Franks, Mary Dalton, and Bessie Mears:</p> <pre> It was a highly geared world whose
Dalton, and Buckley but with devastatingly different results: his youthful status earns him no special legal status.
Dalton is described as a "blind" and ineffectual, though well-meaning, "ghost" because she is a sort of ghost of good intentions, unable to understand the real causes of poverty and degradation in the ghetto and unwilling to undertake the sort of actions to change society fundamentally so that such conditions are no longer possible.
Perhaps the most notable example of this projection is onto the Dalton's white cat, an obvious intertextual allusion to Poe's "The Black Cat," in which the Dalton's cat embodies the white supervision of the black subject.
Dalton) or conceal the real significance of their acts with appeals to allegedly commonly held ideals (as does the corrupt State's Attorney Buckley, who invokes God and civilization in his opening statement at Bigger's trial).
Dalton can own property within the Black Belt, "Bigger could not live in a building across the 'line.' Even though Mr.
Dalton, one may feel uncomfortable in assuming that Taylor's position might somehow be preferable to Bigger's.