Dalkon shield


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An intrauterine device produced by AH Robins that was withdrawn from the market in 1974

Dalkon shield

An IUD produced by AH Robins that was withdrawn from the market in 1974. See Pelvic inflammatory disease. Cf Copper-7, Intrauterine device.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, the Dalkon Shield is widely acknowledged to have had a flawed design; the copper and hormonal IUDs on the market today are considered safe on all counts.
Robinson served from 1989 to 1997 as a federally-appointed trustee of the Dalkon Shield Trust, which disbursed more than $2.
Wood says the Dalkon Shield recall from the 1980s serves as a model for what not to do when issuing a recall.
These resource and informational deficits have resulted in high-profile regulatory failures involving the FDA-approved COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Vioxx and Celebrex, the type 2 diabetes drug Avandia, and the Dalkon Shield intrauterine device.
Initially, the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act did not apply to medical devices--but then came the Dalkon Shield.
knew of dangers associated with the Dalkon Shield well before Robins
I HAD AN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES (IUD) IN THE 70s, when a feminist outcry exposed serious problems caused by the Dalkon Shield IUD, including infertility, uterine perforation, and death.
In her opinion, the downfall of IUDs emerged soon after the Dalkon Shield was introduced in 1971.
Recent examples include not only asbestos, but silicon breast implants, the Dalkon Shield contraceptive and Fen-phen, to name just a few.
In the wake of the Dalkon Shield disaster of the early 1970s, Congress gave the FDA the authority to test and approve new medical devices before they went on the market.
Take the Dalkon Shield, she says: This intrauterine contraceptive device was linked to pelvic infections, infertility, and death in some of the women who used it during the early 1970s (SN: 4/5/75, p.