Dalkon shield


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An intrauterine device produced by AH Robins that was withdrawn from the market in 1974

Dalkon shield

An IUD produced by AH Robins that was withdrawn from the market in 1974. See Pelvic inflammatory disease. Cf Copper-7, Intrauterine device.
References in periodicals archive ?
IN SOME mass toxic harms cases, such as those involving diethylstilbestrol (DES) or the Dalkon shield, lawyers have represented hundreds of plaintiffs at a time; in asbestos cases, the number of claimants ran to more than 10,000.
959 (1989) (denying certiorari in Dalkon Shield bankruptcy).
There is never a word from these authorities on, say, the AH Robins executives who sold millions of defective IUDs, the notorious Dalkon Shield that caused a life-threatening infection in tens of thousands of women.
Besides the breast implant controversy, these cases have involved asbestos, the Dalkon Shield, toxic shock syndrome, Agent Orange, lead, tobacco, and, recently, fen-phen (SN: 10/18/97, p.
People are comparing it to breast implants and the Dalkon Shield.
A relative excess of Dalkon Shield IUDs was observed among case reports carrying the diagnosis of "complicated pregnancy" (Table 1).
Robins gained notoriety as the manufacturer of the Dalkon Shield, an intrauterine birth control device whose faulty design caused infection, sterility, and even death in tens of thousands of women.
The Dalkon Shield, Dow-Corning breast implant and Ford Pinto cases offer testimony to the need for more data or weighing of potential consequences before rushing to the market.
For instance, the FDA tested and approved the Dalkon Shield, an intrauterine birth-control device that killed 18 women and injured thousands more before being pulled off the market in 1975.
Kathryn March, who had used a Dalkon shield for a time in the early, 1970s, spent the years from 1973 to 1989 in one kind of uncomfortable, undignified and heart-breaking infertility treatment after another.
Robbins Company continued to sell the Dalkon shield when they knew of the harm it was causing; the president of Lockheed knowingly paid the Japanese government millions in bribes so they would buy the TriStar wide-bodied passenger plane.
It set a $615 million reserve to cover Dalkon Shield claims, and received a $35 million emergency line of credit for immediate cash obligations.