inulin

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inulin

 [in´u-lin]
a starch occurring in the rhizome of certain plants, which on hydrolysis yields fructose. It is used as a measure of glomerular function in tests of renal function.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·u·lin (In),

(in'yū-lin),
A fructose polysaccharide from the rhizome of Inula helenium or elecampane (family Compositae) and other plants; administered intravenously, it is filtered by the renal glomeruli but not reabsorbed and thus can be used to determine the rate of glomerular filtration; also used in bread for diabetics. Compare: inulin clearance.
Synonym(s): alant starch, alantin, dahlin
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inulin

(ĭn′yə-lĭn)
n.
A polysaccharide with the general formula C6nH10n+2O5n+1 that yields fructose when hydrolyzed and is found in the roots of many plants, especially those of the composite family. It is used as an additive in processed foods to replace fat or sugar and to increase fiber content.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·u·lin

(in'yū-lin)
A fructose polysaccharide from the rhizome of Inula and other plants; used by intravenous injection to determine the rate of glomerular filtration.
Compare: inulin clearance
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inulin

a complex polymer of FRUCTOSE that is soluble in water and occurs in the cell sap of storage organs such as dahlia TUBERS and dandelion TAP ROOTS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·u·lin

(in'yū-lin)
Fructose polysaccharide administered intravenously to determine rate of glomerular filtration.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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