daffodil

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daffodil,

n Latin name:
Narcissus pseudonarcissus; parts used: bulbs, buds, leaves; uses: emetic, congestion, arthritis, burns, wounds; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; eating bulbs or flowers can be fatal; can cause heart collapse, nausea, contact dermatitis, daffodil itch, lung collapse. Also called
daffydown-dilly, fleur de coucou, Lent lily, narcissus, and
porillon.

daffodil


daffodil tree
thevetiaperuviana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ticky said: "The giant daffodil will glow with light after dark and its centre or corona will light up when someone is underneath it.
A search on the internet reveals that multi-headed daffodils are not that unusual.
Daffodil Slate Fabric from Emma Hardicker designs PS48 per metre
Case studies of surviving historic gardens from the early Republic era to the twentieth century examine how old daffodils have survived the vagaries of time.
In the letter, entitled "Steps to avoid daffodil poisonings this spring", PHE director Professor Paul Cosford said: "Each spring stores such as yours provide a wide selection of flowers, particularly cut daffodils and daffodil bulbs.
In the letter, entitled "Steps to avoid daffodil poisonings this daffodil poisonings this spring", spring", PHE director Professor rofessor Paul Cosford said: "said: "Each spring stores such as yours provide a wide selection of flowers, particularly cut daffodils and daffodil bulbs.
Daffodils are the most easily recognised type of narcissus and paper whites which are those delicious early blooming narcissus variety with white, powerfully fragrant, clustered flowers.
The charity needs volunteer collectors to encourage people in the local community to wear a daffodil pin and give a donation.
It is a form of our native daffodil, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, that William Wordsworth extolled in his unforgettable poem.
The Great Daffodil Appeal encourages everyone to give a donation and wear the charity's iconic daffodil pin during March.
Daffodils are incredibly easy to grow, and, once established, these flowers are virtually carefree.
Dr Mark Evans, of the South West Health Protection Unit in England, said: "We want to ensure, in particular, that the Chinese community easily the daffodil unopened bud can be confused with Chinese chives.