DSM-III-R

DSM-III-R

Psychiatry Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders–3rd Edition Revised; a classification system for mental illnesses developed by the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its 4th edition, DSM IV
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The 1987 revision of the third edition, the DSM-III-R, introduced major diagnostic changes for alcohol-related disorders.
Luego, en el DSM-III-r (1986), version corregida del DSM-III, se elimina la "homosexualidad egodistonica" considerada un malestar sobre la propia orientacion sexual.
Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders in the United States.
In 1987, the category of "ego-dystonic homosexuality" was relabeled in the DSM-III-R as "sexual disorder not otherwise specified" (De Cecco, 1987; Kirby, 2003).
Such concerns led the APA to abandon the hierarchy model of DSM-III-R (a limited 1987 reworking of the manual).
The next revision of the DSM system, DSM-III-R, a process also led by Spitzer.
In addition (but this is mostly true for the DSMs after the DSM-III, starting with the DSM-III-R of 1987), psychiatrists have often been pressured by outside groups, such as pharmaceutical companies, to increase the number of disorders or to expand the territory that they cover (Demazeux 2011).
The DSM-III-R quickly followed the DSM-III due to APA's justification of a revision in light of the time between the DSM-III and the publication of the DSM-IV, and a need to integrate accumulated research into the document.
PMDD first appeared as "late luteal phase dysphoric disorder" in Appendix A of the DSM-III-R in 1987, over the objections of some women's groups and clinicians, who viewed its inclusion as pathologizing the menstrual cycle.
In 1987, the American Psychiatric Association's (APA's) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R) added the concept of sexual addiction for the first time as a specific description to be utilized under the more general diagnosis of sexual disorders-not otherwise specified.
The DSM, both in its revision of the third edition (DSM-III-R; American Psychiatric Association [APA] 1987) and in its most recent edition (DSM- IV; APA 1994), avoids the term addiction, preferring instead to use the diagnoses of substance abuse and dependence, collectively referred to as substance use disorders.