do not resuscitate

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do not resuscitate

See DNR.

do not resuscitate

,

DNR

An order stating that a patient should not be revived. It may be written by a physician at the patient's request. If the patient is not competent or is unable to make such a decision, the family, legal guardian, or health care proxy may request and give consent for such an order to be written on the patient's chart and followed by the health care providers. The hospital or physician should have policies regarding time limits and reordering.
See: allow natural death; do not attempt resuscitation
References in periodicals archive ?
The four different procedures were selected to represent different levels of organ support, "invasiveness" and specificity in conventional DNR orders, ranging from CPR (multiorgan support, more invasive, and explicitly limited by a DNR order) to mechanical ventilation and hemodialysis (individual organ support, high-to-moderately invasive, inconsistently limited by DNR orders) to central venous catheters (partial organ support, likely considered less invasive and unlikely to be explicitly limited by a DNR order).
It should be noted that 44 patients (5.28% of the patients who died) did not have a DNR order recorded in the medical record and did not undergo CPR.
If this patient's Florida Department of Health out-of-hospital DNR order confirms his DNR preference, then it is appropriate to withhold resuscitation.
Fendler and co-authors (2015) found DNR orders after in-hospital cardiac arrest were aligned generally with patients' likelihood of favorable neurological survival; however, one-third of patients with the worst prognosis had a DNR order.
Following the incident, the nursing home has assured they would put in more efforts in educating its nurses on determining whether or not a patient or a resident has a DNR order or other directives.
Where no such DNR order has been made, CPR can be discontinued where three physicians agree that continued attempts would prove useless to improving the patient's condition.
* DNR order You also may want to set up a DNR, since a living will doesn't protect you from unwanted emergency care.
Effective 4/1/2018, a physician, physician assistant, or nurse who provides direct care to a patient would have to disclose such a DNR order to the patient's known agent under a medical power of attorney or legal guardian if that individual arrived at the health care facility or hospital.
The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of nurses caring for a patient with a DNR order in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Kigali, Rwanda, in order to suggest nursing recommendations.
* Patients may request a DNR order. As long as the individual is of legal age and competent, an individual may request a DNR order for themselves.