genetic marker

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Related to DNA marker: DNA ladder, Genetic markers

genetic

 [jĕ-net´ik]
1. pertaining to reproduction or to birth or origin.
2. inherited.
genetic code the arrangement of nucleotides in the polynucleotide chain of a chromosome; it governs the transmission of genetic information to proteins, i.e., determines the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain making up each protein synthesized by the cell. Genetic information is coded in DNA by means of four bases: two purines (adenine and guanine) and two pyrimidines (thymine and cystosine). Each adjacent sequence of three bases (a codon) determines the insertion of a specific amino acid. In RNA, uracil replaces thymine.
genetic map
1. the location of mutations along the length of a chromosome, as determined by recombination experiments. The unit of length is the centimorgan (cM), one crossover per meiosis.
2. the sequence of base pairs along the DNA of a chromosome, a technique being applied to humans.
A gene map of Chromosome 18. From Copstead, 1996.
genetic marker a gene having alleles that are all expressed in the phenotype, that is, they are codominant, and which can be used to study inheritance. The various blood group systems and serum or red blood cell proteins easily detected by electrophoresis or immunodiffusion are commonly used markers.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.
Synonym(s): genetic marker

genetic marker

n.
A gene, DNA sequence, or gene product whose inheritance can be traced through a pedigree or phylogeny. Genetic markers are used in paternity testing, studies of evolution, and evaluating genetic contributions to phenotypes including disease. Genetic markers associated with certain diseases can often be detected in the blood serum, where their presence is used to determine whether a person is at high risk for developing a disease.

genetic marker

any specific gene that produces a readily recognizable genetic trait that can be used in family and population studies or in linkage analysis. Also called gene marker, marker gene.

ge·net·ic de·ter·mi·nant

(jĕ-net'ik dĕ-tĕr'mi-nănt)
Any antigenic determinant or identifying characteristic, particularly those of allotypes.

genetic marker

A gene or DNA sequence that indicates the presence of a disease or a probable risk of developing it.

genetic marker

  1. a phenotypic character that can be assigned to a GENE to mark its position on the GENOME.
  2. a characteristic feature of the GENOTYPE, such as a NUCLEOTIDE signature, gene or HETEROCHROMATIC region, that can be used to track a particular individual, TISSUE, CELL, NUCLEUS, CHROMOSOME, PLASMID or gene. Genetic markers are used, for example, to detect the presence of cloning VECTORS in GENETIC ENGINEERING and to monitor ORGANISMS released into the environment. See RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identification of sex-specific DNA markers for date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.
It's true science, not science fiction, because people have already prosecuted cases using their DNA markers.
Use the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers in comparative genome studies.
The DNA markers in this map are highly informative and are densely distributed, with an average interval between markers of 1.
Marker assisted selection (MAS) supported by the utilization of DNA markers linked to wilt resistance genes can be employed to differentiate a large numbers of chickpea genotypes.
DNA markers for identifying waxy mutations and improving noodle quality in wheat.
Moreover, SSR markers immediately supply DNA sequence-tagged-sites for subsequent analyses and DNA marker development.
In two small samples, the frequency of the common allele of this DNA marker, which was shown to be in the threonine transfer RNA gene in mitochondrial DNA, was significantly greater in a high-IQ group than in a low-IQ group.
The selection of a particular genomic DNA marker depends upon the objective of the study and is usually trade-off between practicality and precision of genetic marker (Nagaraju and Goldsmith, 2002).
At the Ames lab, DNA marker technology is being used to glean valuable genetic intelligence on the rootworms.