firewall

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fire·wall

(fīr'wawl)
1. A special building material that is placed in walls between buildings or rooms to prevent the spread of fire.
2. A software program designed to prevent unauthorized persons from accessing a computer system.

firewall

A set of programs that protects the resources of a private computer network from users of other networks. It screens the messages that attempt to enter or leave the network and permits or denies access to outside users based on pre-programmed rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
My Love DMZ is a reflection of Korea's past and present, and a culturally crafted play using Korean mysticism.
As he talks about these and other plans involving Kaesong, Son recognizes the unique, once-unimaginable role he and his fellow servicemembers at the United Nations Command Military Armistice Commission are playing in helping to maintain stability along the DMZ.
The first thing to understand about the Korean DMZ is that it is not simply a chain link fence with a South Korean soldier staring down a North Korean soldier on the other side.
One expert recently wrote that "with the possibility of reunification between the Koreas, the DMZ may be the most important conservation issue throughout Asia.
Currently, three million tourists per year, mostly Korean, flock to the DMZ, to witness the relic of cold war confrontation, not to mention copious amounts of barbed wire.
In most cases, the view from the DMZ into the internal network is valuable as well.
North Korea deploys massive military force along the DMZ which divides the country and South Korea.
8 km stretch within the 4 km wide DMZ itself, but construction work on the North Korean side has been suspended.
A DMZ may give some small creatures peace and quiet--but as a general rule, land mines aren't recommended in parks for large animals, he says.
Because of its proximity to the DMZ, the UNCSB-JSA maintains a rigid pass and leave policy and offers few of the comforts that soldiers from many other units take for granted.
Once these show up, business-to-business applications will be free to flow securely beyond the DMZ.