firewall

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fire·wall

(fīr'wawl)
1. A special building material that is placed in walls between buildings or rooms to prevent the spread of fire.
2. A software program designed to prevent unauthorized persons from accessing a computer system.

firewall

A set of programs that protects the resources of a private computer network from users of other networks. It screens the messages that attempt to enter or leave the network and permits or denies access to outside users based on pre-programmed rules.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2000, there were 19 fires in the DMZ that scorched 91,676 acres of land and detonated 703 landmines.
North Korean standoff over North Korea's claim to have nuclear weapons, the two Koreas have taken many steps together that affect the DMZ and will lead toward agreement on what will happen there.
More than 150,000 tourists visit the DMZ every year.
Founded in 2010, the DMZ (formerly the Digital Media Zone) at Ryerson University is one of Canada's largest business incubators for emerging tech startups.
The DMZ, with its barbed wire, armed soldiers on both sides, and thousands of explosive landmines, is a tragic physical manifestation of how much the Korean people have suffered and lost in war.
We have progressed well ahead of schedule due to the wealth of resources at the DMZ, from qualified business advisors to mentors and beyond.
RSAccess paves the path to the elimination of the traditional role of the DMZ and improves security by closing incoming firewall ports, preventing hackers from accessing the internal network and eliminating sensitive data from the applications servers and database in the DMZ.
The DMZ is so impressive in biodiversity in terms of its ecosystem due to its remoteness and no human impact," Uwe Riecken, director of biotope protection at the German Federal Agency for Nature told a Congress workshop.
The battalion also protects the residents of the nearby farming village of Tae Song Dong, which lies inside the DMZ.
Apparently, the DMZ is home to a mosquito that bears a particular strain of malaria that can remain dormant in the bloodstream for up to two years.
However, the fact the DMZ has been off limits to people is precisely why several rare species endangered in the rest of the world are thriving there.
The Pentagon said there has been no repatriation across the DMZ since 1999.