DHEA-S


Also found in: Acronyms.

DHEA-S

A steroid secreted by the cortex of the suprarenal gland and the testis; a precursor of testosterone. Limited studies suggest that DHEA reduces the percentage of body fat, perhaps by blocking the storage of energy as fat. Commercial formulations of DHEA are marketed as dietary supplements, although it is neither a nutrient nor a component of the human food chain. It has been promoted for the prevention of degenerative diseases including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer dementia, and parkinsonism and other effects of aging, but none of the alleged benefits has been confirmed in large, randomized clinical trials. Long-term administration to postmenopausal women has been associated with insulin resistance, hypertension, and reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, having low DHEA-S levels can cancel out the benefits of certain procedures meant to reduce heart attack risk, such as arterial bypass grafting.
Previous smaller studies had found an association between low DHEA-S levels and heart and blood-vessel, or cardiovascular, disease, although their results were inconclusive.
9) We also know that exercise can act as an immune stimulator as well as increase levels of DHEA-S, both of which not only improve physical performance but also improve wound healing and reduce infection rates in the elderly.
The product comes in two packages, Access DHEA-S Reagent packs (2x50 test) and calibrators (6 vials of 2mL/vial).
Low DHEA-S in these women didn't appear to affect their sexual behavior, Dr.
We conducted a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study cohort to evaluate the following questions: a) What are the relationships between circulating plasma concentrations of DHEA and DHEA-S and risk of subsequent myocardial infarction?
Israeli scientists found that the cognitive dysfunction that occurs in schizophrenia is also partly associated with levels of DHEA-S and other neurosteroids.
A 2009 study of 153 diabetic men with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) found that 77% were DHEA-S deficient, significantly more than in healthy peers.
Recently, it has been clarified that humans largely depend on peripheral tissues for androgen and estrogen formation from the adrenal precursor DHEA-S and DHEA (1, 2).
Seasonal variation has been shown previously in women for DHEA-S (5) and prolactin (6), whereas other studies have failed to demonstrate seasonal variation for prolactin (5, 7) and testosterone (7).