CD209

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CD209

A gene on chromosome 19p13 that encodes a pathogen-recognition receptor expressed on the surface of immature dendritic cells which is involved in initiating a primary immune response. These receptors are thought to recognise high mannose N-linked oligosaccharides present on the surface of pathogens (such as HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV gp120, amongst others) in a calcium-dependent fashion. Once bound, the receptor mediates endocytosis of the pathogens, which are subsequently degraded in lysosomal compartments. The receptor returns to the cell membrane surface, while the pathogen-derived antigens are presented to resting T-cells via MHC class II proteins to initiate the adaptive immune response.
References in periodicals archive ?
DC-SIGN expression was noted in Hofbauer cells (Fig.
Two micrometre sections were cut onto poly-L-lysine coated slides and stained with DC-SIGN (purified mouse antihuman CD209 antibody, dilution 1:40, BD Biosciences, US) and DC-SIGNRs (monoclonal antihuman CD209L antibody, dilution 1:40, R&D systems, US) using the Envision kit.
In addition, the expression of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNRs was inversely associated with [CD4.
Allele and genotype frequencies of CCR2 V64I (G/A), MCP-1 -2518 A/G, SDF-1[alpha] 3'UTR G/A and DC-SIGN exon 4 repeat polymorphisms among different study groups are presented in Tables II and III.
The allele and genotype frequencies of CCR2 V64I (G/A), MCP-1 -2518 A/G, SDF-1[alpha] 3'UTR G/A and DC-SIGN exon 4 repeat polymorphisms were not different between total HIV patients (includes both HIV patients with and without TB) and healthy controls (data not shown).
The most frequent DC-SIGN gene exon 4 repeat number observed was 7.
This process appears to be controlled in part by the newly identified molecule DC-SIGN.
Figdor and colleagues discovered that the initial contact between resting T cells and antigen presenting dendritic cells occurs via the novel dendritic cell specific receptor identified as DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific, ICAM-3 Grabbing Non-integrin).
Figdor, and AIDS researchers at New York University now report in the March 3 CELL that HIV uses its gp120 to bind to a dendritic cell's DC-SIGN.
They also find that when they mix HIV, dendritic cells, and T cells in a test tube, DC-SIGN somehow helps the virus infect T cells.
The team found that DC-SIGN binds to major allergen from house dust mite (Der p 1) and dogs (Can f 1) and seems to play a regulatory role in the allergic response to house dust mite allergens.
The discovery shows that DC-SIGN could potentially play a beneficial role in regulating immune responses to environmental allergens.