serine

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Related to D-serine: L-serine

serine

 [sēr´ēn]
a naturally occurring, nonessential amino acid, used as a dietary supplement, in biological studies and tests, and in culture media.

ser·ine (S, Ser),

(ser'ēn),
2-Amino-3-hydroxypropanoic acid; the l-isomer is one of the amino acids occurring in proteins.

serine

/ser·ine/ (Ser) (S) (sēr´ēn) a naturally occurring nonessential amino acid present in many proteins.

serine

(sĕr′ēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C3H7NO3, that is a common constituent of many proteins.

serine (Ser)

[ser′ēn]
a nonessential amino acid found in many proteins in the body (e.g., casein, vitellin). It is synthesized from glycine or threonin and a precursor of the amino acids purine, cysteine, and others. It can be found in urine. See also amino acid, protein.
enlarge picture
Chemical structure of serine

SERPING1

A gene on chromosome 11q12-q13.1 that encodes a highly glycosylated plasma protein which regulates the complement cascade by inhibiting activated C1r and C1s, thereby preventing complement activation.

Molecular pathology
C1-INH/SERPING1 deficiency is associated with hereditary angioneurotic oedema (HANE).

ser·ine

(S) (sĕr'ēn)
One of the amino acids occurring in proteins.

serine

A non-essential amino acid found as a component of most proteins. It is a precursor of choline, glucine, cysteine and pyruvate. Serine is present in most diets but most of the body serine is synthesized.
Serineclick for a larger image
Fig. 282 Serine . Molecular structure.

serine (S, Ser)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins. It has a polar ‘R’ group structure and is soluble in water. See Fig. 282 . The ISOELECTRIC POINT of serine is 5.7.

ser·ine

(sĕr'ēn)
One of the amino acids occurring in proteins.

serine

Ser; a naturally occurring amino acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recovery % = (concentration of D-serine + concentration of L-serine calculated after Sumichiral separation)/ (concentration of DL-serine applied to the Sumichiral column from the first RP-18 HPLC run) x 100.
The Sumichiral column separation of dabsyl D-serine, L-serine, and the D-tert-leucine in the standard and a CSF sample are shown in Fig.
3 [micro]mol/L when evaluated on dabsyl D-serine and L-serine calibrators with r > 0.
The LOQ values for dabsyl D-serine, L-serine, and D-tert-leucine were 0.
Recovery calculations for the 45 CSF samples showed a mean 87% recovery for D-serine and L-serine from the Sumichiral column (see Table 1 in the Data Supplement that accompanies the online version of this article at http://www.
Preclinical studies have combined D-serine with an inhibitor of D-amino acid oxidase to prevent D-serine breakdown.
Table 2 The effect of NMDA and D-serine with kainate on the electrical activity of hydra Treatment period (b) Electrical C pT activity (a) Treatment: 1 X [10.
Table 3 The effect of NMDA and D-serine without AMP A or kainate on the electrical activity of hydra Treatment period (b) Electrical C T1 activity (a) 1 X [10.
No other treatment, including that of NMDA and D-serine alone, had an effect of the RP system (Tables 1 and 3).
In this study we have presented evidence that the glutamatergic agonist, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and D-serine, together with [alpha]-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), increases tentacle activity by causing an increase in the output of the tentacle pulse pacemaker system and the rate of locally recorded, small, uncorrelated pulses in the tentacle (SUTPs).
NMDA and D-serine, in the presence of AMPA/kainate, increased TP and SUTP rates, and also potentially decreased RP and SUBP rates.
The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.