cycloserine

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cycloserine

 [si″klo-ser´ēn]
an antibiotic elaborated by Streptomyces orchidaceus or produced synthetically, used as a tuberculostatic and in the treatment of urinary tract infections.

cy·clo·ser·ine

(sī'klō-ser'ēn),
An antibiotic produced by strains of Streptomyces orchidaceus or S. garyphalus with a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity.
Synonym(s): orientomycin

cycloserine

(sī′klō-sĕr′ēn)
n.
An antibiotic effective against a wide range of bacteria, used especially in the treatment of tuberculosis and infections of the urinary tract.

cycloserine

Infectious disease A broad-spectrum antibiotic used for UTIs and TB Adverse effects CNS Sx, allergy, skin rash, ↑ LFTs

cy·clo·ser·ine

(sī'klō-ser'ēn)
An antibiotic produced by strains of Streptomyces orchidaceus or S. garyphalus with a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity.

cycloserine

A drug used to treat TUBERCULOSIS caused by organisms resistant to treatment by standard drugs such as rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol and streptomycin. The drug is on the WHO official list.

cy·clo·ser·ine

(sī'klō-ser'ēn)
An antibiotic produced by strains of Streptomyces orchidaceus or S. garyphalus with a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive enhancers as adjuncts to psychotherapy: use of D-cycloserine in phobic individuals to facilitate extinction of fear.
Goff, "D-cycloserine in schizophrenia: new strategies for improving clinical outcomes by enhancing plasticity," Current Neuropharmacology, vol.
Of 50 MDR-TB isolates, 18 (18/50, 36%) showed resistance to ethionamide (ET), 13 (13/50, 26%) to d-cycloserine (DC), 11 (11/50, 22%) to ciprofloxacin (CP), 7 (7/50, 14%) to kanamycin (KA), 6 (6/50, 12%) to p-aminosalicylic acid (PA), and 5 (5/50, 10%) to amikacin (AM).
Urbano and her colleagues conducted a 10-week uncontrolled, randomized, double-blind trial comparing D-cycloserine once daily at 50 mg or once weekly at 50 mg for 8 weeks in 20 patients with ASD.
Facilitation of conditioned fear extinction by systemic administration or intra-amygdala infusions of D-cycloserine as assessed with fear-potentiated startle in rats.
Pharmacological enhancers of extinction (systemic) Drug Action Preclinical d-cycloserine partial NMDAr agonist methylene blue metabolic enhancer yohimbine noradrenergic a2r antagonist sulpiride dopamine D2r antagonist AM-404 cannabinoid reuptake inhibitor WIN 55,212-2 cannabinoid receptor agonist dexamethasone glucocorticoid receptor agonist PEPA AMPA receptor potentiator Clinical d-cycloserine partial NMDAr agonist cortisol endogenous glucocorticoid Reference Preclinical Walker et al., 2002 (63) Gonzalez-Lima and Bruchey, 2004 (64) Cain et al., 2004 (65) Ponnusamy et al., 2005 (66) Chhatwal et al., 2005 (67) Pamplona et al., 2006 (68) Yang et al., 2006 (69) Zushida et al., 2007 (70) Clinical Ressler et al., 2004 (71) Soravia et al., 2006 (72) Table 2.
However, D-Cycloserine injections to other brain regions didn't help the rats.
Additional clinical proof of concept studies have demonstrated the potential benefits of D-cycloserine in treating a variety of anxiety disorders including Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and OCD, amongst others.
Once field testing is complete, participants in the Iraq war veteran study will take D-cycloserine (Seromycin), alprazolam (Xanax), or a placebo before each virtual reality exposure "to see how they do," Dr.
Further, the use of NMDAR glycine site agonists such as glycine, D-serine, or D-cycloserine in clinical trials has demonstrated some efficacy in ameliorating the negative symptoms and cognitive disabilities in schizophrenics (Coyle and Tsai 2004a, 2004b).
The drug, D-cycloserine, does not work on its own but in combination with conventional 'exposure therapy', the standard form of treatment for phobias which involves exposing people to whatever it is they are afraid of.