tarsus

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tarsus

 [tahr´sus]
1. the seven bones composing the ankle joint, including the talus, calcaneus, navicular bone, cuboid bone, and medial, intermediate, and lateral cuneiform bones. See also ankle.
Tarsus, showing the seven tarsal bones. From Dorland's, 2000.
2. the connective tissue plate forming the framework of an eyelid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tar·sus

, gen. and pl.

tar·si

(tar'sŭs, -sī),
1. As a division of the skeleton, the seven tarsal bones of the instep.
See also: inferior tarsus, superior tarsus. Synonym(s): root of foot
2. The fibrous plates giving solidity and form to the edges of the eyelids; often erroneously called tarsal or ciliary cartilages.
See also: inferior tarsus, superior tarsus. Synonym(s): skeleton of eyelid
Synonym(s): ankle (3)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tarsus

(tär′səs)
n. pl. tar·si (-sī, -sē)
1.
a. The section of the vertebrate foot between the leg and the metatarsus.
b. The bones making up this section, especially the seven small bones of the human ankle.
2. A fibrous plate that supports and shapes the edge of the eyelid. Also called tarsal plate.
3. Zoology
a. The tarsometatarsus.
b. The distal part of the leg of an arthropod, usually divided into segments.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tar·sus

, pl. tarsi (tahr'sŭs, -sī) [TA]
1. As a division of the skeleton, the seven tarsal bones of the instep.
See also: tarsal bones
2. The fibrous plates giving solidity and form to the edges of the eyelids; often erroneously called tarsal or ciliary cartilages.
[G. tarsos, a flat surface, sole of the foot, edge of eyelid]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

tarsus

1. The part of the foot between the leg and the metatarsal bones.
2. The seven bones of the tarsus
3. A fibrous plate that gives rigidity and shape to the eyelid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

tarsus

see TARSAL BONE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tarsus 

Thin flat plate of dense connective tissue, situated one in each eyelid, which gives it shape and firmness. Each tarsus extends from the orbital septum to the eyelid margin. The upper tarsal plate, shaped like the letter D placed on its side, is much larger than the lower. Its width is 11mm in the centre whereas the corresponding measurement in the lower tarsus, which is somewhat oblong in form, is 5mm. Each tarsus is about 29mm long and 1mm thick. Within each tarsus are the meibomian glands, approximately 25 in the upper and 20 in the lower. Syn. tarsal plate. See palpebral ligament; orbital septum.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

Patient discussion about tarsus

Q. What Causes ankle Swelling? My son woke up this morning with a red, swollen ankle. What could cause this situation?

A. A swollen and red ankle suggest either a traumatic injury to the joint or an infection in the joint, adjacent tissues or bones. This is an emergency and it is important to consult a doctor as soon as possible, especially if the joint loses its ability to perform movements in all directions.

Q. What do you do for a sprained ankle?

A. R.I.C.E. - Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation

Q. How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury? While I exercise I often get sprain. I have seen many times that ice is used as a first aid for sprains. How does ice help a sprained ankle or other injury?

A. it does two helpful things- lower the pain (cold can do that) and prevent swelling. the swelling is a body normal reaction that protects the area that was injured. but we would like to avoid it because it'll strain us.

More discussions about tarsus
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References in periodicals archive ?
After Caesar's death, Cleopatra, with the collaboration of her court ladies, presented herself on the river Cydnus to Antony's viewing.
Her splendid appearance on Cydnus (Plutarch 201; 2.2.196ff) and her attempt to conceal some of her children's inheritance from the victorious Octavian (Plutarch 287; 5.2.136ff) remind us of her riches.
While we ponder the decadence, beauty, and wonder of Plutarch's description of Cleopatra's barge on the Cydnus, as delivered so memorably by Enobarbus in Act 2 scene 2, we should also be aware that this particular pageant would have cost a lot of both money and "sweat equity." Strikingly, the adjective that Agrippa uses (twice) in responding to Enobarbus's account is "rare" (2.2.212, 225); what is rare is rarely also cheap.