cyclotron

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cy·clo·tron

(sī'klō-tron),
An accelerator that produces high-speed ions (for example, protons and deuterons) under the influence of an alternating magnetic field, for bombardment and disruption of atomic nuclei. Used to produce clinically useful positron-emitting radionuclides.
[cyclo- + G. -tron, instrumental suffix]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cyclotron

Radiation therapy A device used to accelerate charged particles–eg, protons to higher energy levels, in which a magnetic field causes the particles to orbit, which are accelerated by an oscillating electric field. See Radiotherapy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cy·clo·tron

(sī'klō-tron)
A particle accelerator that speeds up particles in a spiral pattern to produce protons for nuclear research or radiation treatment.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cy·clo·tron

(sī'klō-tron)
A particle accelerator that speeds up particles in a spiral pattern to produce protons for nuclear research or radiation treatment.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The acquisition of ABT will bring a wealth of experience in smaller cyclotron technology, as well as in automated chemistry to TeamBest.
This section reviews the history of cyclotrons, with some discussion about how cyclotrons work.
The key to making isotopes locally is the availability of a cyclotron, which accelerates charged particles to create radioactive versions of target materials.
Consequently, CTI will be using forged rings and hubs in all of its future cyclotrons.
neurosurgeon Gary Steinberg can deliver bursts of cyclotron energy to destroy arteriovenous malformations, tangles of blood vessels that constrict the brain, with minimal damage to healthy tissue.
So, working with Newton Scientific of Cambridge, Mass., he figured out how to use his university's cyclotron accelerator to generate some of the radionuclides needed.
Their projects covered 14 categories and ranged from homemdade cyclotrons to self-cooling lunch packs.