cycad

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cycad

(sī′kad″, kăd) [L. Cycas, a genus name]
A variety of palmlike evergreen plants, including Cycas revoluta and C. circinalis, from which cycasin has been isolated.

cycad

any tropical or subtropical GYMNOSPERM of the order Cycadales. Cycads date from the MESOZOIC PERIOD. Present-day forms grow to 20 m in height and have a crown of fern-like leaves. They live for up to a thousand years.

cycad

a member of the plant genus of cycas, dioecious, non-flowering woody plants (gymnosperms) which produce seeds in a woody cone consisting of exposed seed leaves (sporophylls), not enclosed in an ovary. The leaves are usually in a rosette at the top of the stem, which may be subterranean. Include Bowenia, Cycas, Dioon, Encephalartos, Lepidozamia, Macrozamia, Zamia spp.

cycad glycoside
group of glycosides including cycasin, macrozamin, found in cycad plants; oxidized in vivo to release toxin methylazoxymethanol (MAM).
References in periodicals archive ?
If pet owners are concerned that their pet may have ingested Cycad plants or any other toxic plants, it is essential they contact their veterinarian immediately.
It may appear that the high diversity in South Africa is due to more fieldwork and taxonomic study having been conducted in this region than in other countries, but since the turn of the century there has been an increase in fieldwork on cycads in other African countries with several new species being described, but this has not changed the overall pattern of species richness (Donaldson, 2003).
In general, cycads present low observed heterozygosis, low genetic diversity and low differentiation between populations, except in Cycas guizhouensis, where differentiation was found to be high (Long-Qian et al.
cultural practices, chemical or biological control) of this invasive pest is paramount in a global center of biodiversity of cycads such as Mexico.
Species of Aulacoscelis Duponchal and Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae) and Nomotus Gorham (Languriidae) feed on fronds of Central American cycads.
Fossil Cycad is a compelling story, and the more that we look into it, the more we find a lot of lessons learned, which can guide us today to protect nonrenewable resources that have not yet disappeared.
Moreover, there can be little doubt that it will also be found at other landscaped sites in Dubai, and perhaps at other sites in the UAE and elsewhere in Arabia, where ornamental cycads are present.
Probably the most relevant one is that by Greguss (1968), which considered most cycad species known at the time, and was centered mostly on characters useful in paleobotany, such as epidermal anatomy.
The authors produced a 23-page document, including a table of scientific names, localities and vernacular names of African, American, Asian and Oceanic cycads.
In: Toxicity of Cycads: Implications for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Cancer, Fifth Cycad Conference 1967 (Whiting MG, ed.
Fire and water: aspects of Aboriginal management of cycads.