cycad

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cycad

(sī′kad″, kăd) [L. Cycas, a genus name]
A variety of palmlike evergreen plants, including Cycas revoluta and C. circinalis, from which cycasin has been isolated.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

cycad

any tropical or subtropical GYMNOSPERM of the order Cycadales. Cycads date from the MESOZOIC PERIOD. Present-day forms grow to 20 m in height and have a crown of fern-like leaves. They live for up to a thousand years.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to biogeographical limitations, cycads are vulnerable to anthropogenic activities and require particular conservation attention.
Caterpillars of Eumaeus childrenae (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) feeding on two species of cycads (Zamiaceae) in the Huasteca region, Mexico.
Responses of cycads with different life histories to the impact of plant collecting: simulation models to determine important life history stages and population recovery times.
Species of Aulacoscelis Duponchal and Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae) and Nomotus Gorham (Languriidae) feed on fronds of Central American cycads. ColeopteristsBulletin, 53: 217-231.
pandava has proven to be a successful coloniser, using both native and ornamental cycads. Within the past fifteen years it has spread from its native India and Southeast Asia to various other regions including temperate East Asia (Korea and Japan) (Wu et al.
Reflecting this interest, and 'using all available cycad literature', Bonta and Osborne (2007:1) published a worldwide review, 'Cycads in the vernacular: A compendium of local names', in which they 'compiled a table of scientific names, localities, languages, vernacular names and where known, translations into English'.
In: Toxicity of Cycads: Implications for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Cancer, Fifth Cycad Conference 1967 (Whiting MG, ed.).
Macrozamia is one of the four genera of cycads present in Australia: Bowenia, Cycas, Lepidozamia and Macrozamia (Jones 1998:14).
Palm House keeper Wes Shaw said: "Cycads are fascinating prehistoric plants and this is one of the most unique plants in Kew gardens.