cyborg

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cyborg

(sī′bôrg′)
n.
An organism, often a human, that has certain physiological processes enhanced or controlled by mechanical or electronic devices, especially when they are integrated with the nervous system.
A hypothetical term for a person with bionic and/or cybernetic replacement parts that may have capabilities that the original biological components did not—e.g., increased strength, telescopic vision, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For now, Harbisson, the co-founder of The Cyborg Foundation, the international organisation that defends cyborg rights and supports people who want to become cyborgs, is committed to changing attitudes about his kind.
Due to the surgery impact, before there is any training, under the reward stimulation, some rat cyborgs prefer to turn left while others prefer the opposite.
As Haraway argues, cyborgs are possible by blurring the human/machine, human/animal, and physical/non-physical boundaries.
84) Cyborgs can use the new media to offer counterdiscourses so that the Internet does not continue to be a means where difference becomes a basis for inequality.
Arnold Schwarzenegger has played the role of the cyborg first in 1984, in the movie "The Terminator.
Just like stories, sea monsters and cyborgs have a history that begins with a distinct lack of evidence (Jameson, 1994).
Un tel destin de cyborg fait pour lui figure d'aboutissement.
Professor Kevin Warwick, an expert in cyborg technology, will explain the radical plans while delivering a talk at the city's Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) tonight.
Aunque muchos cyborgs pesadillescos pueblan el mundo de la ciencia ficcion, este ser es tambien un sueno de armonia y comunicacion idealizada entre maquinas y hombres, una extrana utopia de polinizacion entre diversas especies, la feliz fusion de lo maquinal, lo evolucionado y lo manufacturado.
His juxtaposition of Norbert Wiener's historical conception of the cyborg as a construct of cybernetic theory with Donna Haraway's socially critical concept of the cyborg as an eliminator of boundaries--human-machine, animal-human, physical-non-physical--arms the reader with one of the necessary tools to make the most of Biro's analysis of Berlin Dada.
Both the co-written introduction and Ivan Callus's closing chapter betray an anxiety about justifying the connection between Borges and the figure of the cyborg that seems to me excessive and distracting.
Maintaining this doubled historical focus, each chapter anchors Enlightenment man-machines and postmodern cyborgs in the political, medical, and technological discourses of their times.