netizen

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netizen

(1) Any person who communicates on the Internet and belongs to the global electronic village.
(2) An Internet citizen who uses networked resources, which connotes civic responsibility and participation.

netizen

Online Any person who communicates on the Internet and belongs to the global electronic village; an Internet citizen, who uses networked resources, which connotes civic responsibility and participation. See Digerati, Internet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Percentage of "cybercitizens" rating the following Web site characteristics as extremely or very desirable.
Carnegie Mellon CyLab is a world leader in both technological research and the education of professionals in information assurance, security technology, business, and policy, as well as security awareness among cybercitizens of all ages.
The fast growing digitalized world population or cybercitizens are integrated to each other via the internet.
Moreover, understanding the ways in which knowledge is constructed, referenced, and disseminated on open sites like Wikipedia has deep curricular and pedagogical implications for both teachers and students in terms of developing their digital critical literacy practices as civically engaged cybercitizens.
From New Zealand, Grey reminds us that we have a responsibility to teach children cybersafety so that they learn to perform ethically as cybercitizens. She argues we must work closely with families around cybercitizenship, particularly as we, the professionals, are likely to have more training in issues of cybersafety than some of the families with whom we work.
Consequently, Chinese market throughout the world becomes the second largest Internet market in terms of cybercitizens and one of the most important areas in their global expansion plan.
This runs in contradiction with the civil society, for there is already a participative spirit developed among cybercitizens, as it is evident from the increased number of Greek bloggers presenting their views on current social and political issues and the emergence of sites hosting NGOs and other political organisations.
(25) By using this tool that gives young people the sense that their voice and opinions have value, the social studies can advance youth engagement, promote students' capacity to challenge their own thinking as well as the thinking of others, and subsequently foster deeper and more meaningful interactions among our most active cybercitizens.
Ermann, Shauf and Williams (2002), a 256-page anthology, deals with, according to the publisher's synopsis, "topics such as the work-related ramifications of automation, the ethical obligations of computer specialists, and the threats to privacy that come with increased computerization." A publication of International Society for Technology in Education, Willard (2002) deals not only with social responsibility but also with social relationships in cyberspace, arguing that the best thing cybercitizens can do is stay current with emergent laws, policies, and practices within cyberspace.
Today, while English is still the dominant single language, with almost 36 percent of the world's Internet population having English as their country's national language, non-English speakers represent more than 62 percent of cybercitizens. A breakdown of these non-English-speaking Internet users may come as a surprise: Chinese (14.1 percent), Japanese (9.6 percent), Spanish (9 percent), German (7.3 percent), and Korean (4.1 percent, with 70 percent of the households using broadband Internet connections, according to The Economist).
at 832; see also Amy Harmon, We the People of the Internet: Cybercitizens Debate How to Form On-Line Union, Perfect or Otherwise, N.Y.