cyber attack

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cyber attack

The disruption of a computer (system) with viruses, worms, or other malware.
See also: attack
References in periodicals archive ?
South Africa has the most advanced communication infrastructure in Africa and is in the process of developing cyber-security policies since there is potential for the exploitation of vulnerabilities in a cyber-warfare scenario on the continent.
"In the long run, cyber-warfare is where all parties lose: attackers, victims and even uninvolved observers.
Worried by the rapid rise of advanced technology, Moscow has spent several years pushing the United Nations into adopting new guiding principles for the Internet age that prohibit countries from engaging in so-called cyber-warfare.
As well as the propaganda campaign, cyber-warfare can be used to target vital strategic communications and defence systems.
(28) Bradley Graham, Bush Orders Guidelines for Cyber-Warfare,
Instead of spending billions on nuclear deterrents and oldstyle ground wars, the MoD should invest in cyber-warfare and counter-terrorism.
(20.) Bradley Graham, Bush Orders Guidelines for Cyber-Warfare: Rules for Attacking Enemy Computers Prepared as U.S.
The Air Force announced with great fanfare earlier this year that it was elevating the mission of cyber-warfare to an all-important status, and designated the 8th Air Force at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., as the home of the new Cyberspace Command.
"Cyber-warfare is a real possibility, given the skill sets and resources of today's terrorists and cyber-criminals," said James Tucker, assistant vice president, Chubb & Son, and loss control computer security specialist, Chubb Commercial Insurance.
The research showed that almost three quarters of all respondents thought that some kind of cyber-warfare is likely to occur in the near future.
"We are detecting with increasing frequency the appearance of doctrines and dedicated offensive cyber-warfare programs," he said, alluding to China and Russia.
Media coverage of hacking and cyber-warfare, alongside users' apprehension over their systems' vulnerabilities will drive the market to $24.7bn by 2005 from $1.1bn last year, predicts "European Network Security Software Markets." Other motivating factors include the pull exerted by the web, the rise of e-commerce and the subsequent demand for secured data.