cyanoacrylate

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cyanoacrylate

A powerful adhesive, popularly known as Superglue that is occasionally used in surgery as a substitute for stitches. In many cases the results are better than with sutures. The adhesive is marketed for surgical use under the generic name enbucrilate and the brand name Histoacryl.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new Cyanoacrylate Dispensing Guide provides detailed information about the properties of this fast-curing material and how those properties create advantages and disadvantages in production.
Cyanoacrylate glues are liquid alkyl-2-cyanoacrylate monomers that, on contact with ionic mediums (e.g., water, blood), form fexible polymers with strong adhesive bonds to soft tissues.
Reports in the specialized literature on the effect of temperature on particle size in anionic polymerization of alkyl cyanoacrylates in aqueous dispersions containing surfactants are scarce.
Along with the rapid room-temperature cure, cyanoacrylates are solvent-free and have a wide range of viscosities to choose from.
In general, there are a variety of appealing characteristics when using monomer-based systems such as cyanoacrylates or methylene malonates: they are formaldehyde-free, eliminate or diminish energy and solvent use, provide significant increases in production speeds and full cure properties, and have diverse functionality for generalized and focused industrial applications.
Superglue, or cyanoacrylate, was used during the Vietnam War to close wounds while injured soldiers were being transported to hospitals for surgery.
The use of a cyanoacrylate skin protectant to man, age skin tears was evaluated in 30 patients in an acute care setting.
ADHEZION Biomedical's topical skin adhesive SurgiSeal features a greater breaking strength and broader use in clinical applications than existing n-butyl cyanoacrylates. Increased flexibility contributes to patient comfort and helps preserve the integrity of the adhesive, preventing premature sloughing.
Coover is best known for his invention of cyanoacrylates, later marketed as "super glue." In fact, when Coover first experimented with them in the 1940s, cyanoacrylate monomers were a nuisance; everything they touched stuck to everything else--including some very expensive lab equipment.
Cyanoacrylates and two-part epoxies work well to install inserts into carbon arrows, but bonds aren't reversible.
Cyanoacrylates were first synthesized in 1949 via a reaction between cyanoacetate and formaldehyde.