Cuterebra


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Cuterebra

(kū-te-rē'bră),
A genus of botflies with large blue or black bumblebeelike adults, the larvae of which most commonly infest rodents and lagomorphs (hares and rabbits); the larvae develop into large spiny grubs, usually in the subcutaneous connective tissue of the neck. Similar grubs, probably of other species, are not uncommon in cats and are sometimes found in dogs and in humans.
[L. cutis, skin, + terebro, to bore, fr. terebra, an auger]

Cuterebra

(kut?e-re'bra, ku-ter')
A genus of botflies whose maggots (larvae) may infest the skin, causing myiasis.
See: botfly; myiasis
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
fontinella (the only known mouse-specialist Cuterebra species in Florida), in none of these studies was the species of Cuterebra identified.
Two flies obtained from larvae infesting an eastern woodrat (Neotoma floridana) in Indian River County, Florida, are identified as Cuterebra fontinella, a species that typically parasitizes various species of mice.
Bot fly (Cuterebra sp.) parasitism of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in southern Illinois.
Effects of bot fly (Cuterebra fontinella) parasitism on a population of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).
Effects of bot fly (Cuterebra) parasitism on activity patterns of Peromyscus maniculatus in the laboratory.
Identification of a surgically removed Cuterebra larva by scanning electron microscopy.
During curation of the immature insect collection in the Department of Entomology & Nematology at the University of Florida, an isopropanol-preserved larva that appeared to belong to a Cuterebra species was encountered.
Bot flies, Cuterebra sp., are myiasis-producing parasites that typically infect rodents and lagomorphs (Davidson & Nettles 1988).
However, a cuterebra infestation has a distinguishing feature in cats that owners should be aware of: "If it ends up developing its lesion in the skin and migrates deep into the cat's body, it is lethal.
Cuterebra cutaneous myiasis: Case report and world literature review.
There are over 30 Cuterebra species that have evolved to be host-specific obligate parasites (Sabrosky 1986; Wood 1987).