cut point


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cut point

In an analysis of data, a specified value used to sort continuous variables into discrete categories. It may be set according to its usefulness in predicting abnormal clinical events or arbitrarily.

Blood pressure measurements, for example, are continuous variables: in general, the higher one's pressure, the greater one's risk of congestive heart failure, kidney disease, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The analysis of blood pressure measurements has shown that the risk for these events climbs sharply as systolic blood pressures rise above 139 mm Hg. Therefore hypertension is defined by the cut point of 140 mm Hg, even though lower pressures may be harmful for some patients and higher pressures may be relatively well tolerated by a small number of other patients.

See also: point
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, by restricting the modeling to local data around the cut point, where regression discontinuity is most valid, problems with tail probabilities are avoided.
In the PLCO cohort, the lower cut point was associated with a 43% increased risk (OR, 1.43).
Data from the UKPDS33, ADVANCE, ACCORD, and VADT studies were analyzed to identify the specific cut point of HbA1c reduction that had a nonglycemic beneficial effect in two groups: (1) ASCVD primary prevention and (2) ASCVD secondary prevention or very high risk.
The entire cohort met the criteria for obesity defined by BMI, waist circumference, and FMI cut points (Table 2).
Requiring positivity on both methods would not enhance specificity because the SCM failed to correctly reclassify any of the 10 total score false positive misclassifications under relaxed criteria at its best-performing cut point. Hence, we abandoned further analysis of combining the two scoring methods.
Easily adjust cut point, low maintenance, easy to clean, compact, and available with an optional anti-abrasion resistant coating.
For instance, when a cut point does not exist, probit and logit techniques using votes as the dependent variable will not produce consistent estimates.
In this illustrative application, the physicians who are above the cut point are labeled "above threshold" and the remaining labeled "below threshold." In such a categorization system, there are two types of misclassification errors: (1) flagging an above-threshold physician as being below the threshold (equivalent to a false negative) and (2) flagging a below-threshold physician as above threshold (equivalent to a false positive).
"Number One was innovative for its time, the first internal fan classifier with sharp cut point classification and recirculation.
A cut point of 8 or higher on the Leiden clinical prediction rule 's linked to a good predictive value in determining which patients with undifferentiated arthritis are at risk for rheumatoid arthritis, according to a meta-analysis of data sets examined with the tool.
"This nomogram could be a laminated card which a physician could sit with at his desk when faced with a suspected placenta accreta patient, to decide whether she is above or below our cut point, whether we think she actually does or does not have placenta accreta."