curie

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curie

 (Ci) [ku´re]
a unit of radioactivity, defined as the quantity of any radioactive nuclide in which the number of disintegrations per second is 3.700 × 1010.

Curie

Marie (1867-193) and Pierre (1859-1906), French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates (wife and husband). See: curium.

cu·rie (C, c, Ci),

(kyū'rē),
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 ×1010 disintegrations per second; formerly defined as the radioactivity of the amount of radon in equilibrium with 1 g radium; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).
[Marie (1867-1934) and Pierre (1859-1906) Curie, French chemists and physicists and Nobel laureates]

curie

An obsolete unit of radioactivity (i.e., radioactive decay) equal to 3.7 x 1010 disintegrations/sec of a radioactive nuclide, roughly equivalent to the activity of 1 g of radium; the curie was replaced by the SI-derived unit for radioactivity, the Becquerel (2.70 x 10-11 curies).

cu·rie

(Ci) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity, 3.70 × 1010 disintegrations per second; superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).

Curie,

Marie, French physicist, 1867-1934.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

Curie,

Pierre, French physicist, 1859-1906.
curie - a unit of measurement of radioactivity.

cu·rie

(C) (kyūr'ē)
A unit of measurement of radioactivity superseded by the S.I. unit, the becquerel (1 disintegration per second).
References in periodicals archive ?
Pycior, in her article "Reaping the benefits of collaboration while avoiding its pitfalls: Marie Curie's Rise to Scientific Prominence," (in Social Studies of Science [1993]), Curie was astute about demonstrating her independent intellectual achievements and published some results in her own name, even as Pierre's results on radium were always published with joint authorship.
The challenges in an "age of information" proliferated, and in the 1920s Curie engaged closely with two specific, interrelated issues regarding intellectual property.
Moreover, scientists often patented instruments, if not their discoveries, as had Pierre Curie, providing important income to his wife and daughters after his death.
Marie Curie was born Maria Sklodowska in Warsaw in 1867 during a period when the Polish nation was subsumed under of the repressive regime of the Russian czars.
But sometime in the spring of 1894, Marie Sklodowska was introduced to Pierre Curie. Very soon, everything changed.
At 35, Pierre Curie was eight years older than Marie and had already done work that should have been well known in scientific circles: His study of crystals had led him to postulate important laws of symmetry, and he had been conducting experiments in magnetism that would produce enduring laws.
Complementing the work at the Newcastle Hospice, Marie Curie Nurses work across the region to provide free care to patients with terminal cancer and other illnesses in their own homes.
Estelle Vasey, chairman of the Northern Rock Charity Committee, said: "Planting a daffodil bulb in the Marie Curie Field of Hope is a tangible way of remembering friends and loved ones and it looks so beautiful when they bloom in spring and of course they return each year to remind us."
In 1911 Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for producing a pure metal sample of radium and establishing the atomic weight of radium and polonium.
At the onset of World War I, and although she despised war, Curie donated she and her late husband's Nobel Prize medals to the French war effort (Pierre had died an untimely death in 1906).
Of course, Curie couldn't have foreseen that the papers documenting her life would intimidate archivists many decades after her death.
Curie understood that radium, like the sun, could have both therapeutic and destructive uses.