copper

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Related to Cuprum: Cuprum metallicum

copper

 (Cu) [kop´er]
a chemical element, atomic number 29, atomic weight 63.54. (See Appendix 6.) It is necessary for bone formation and for the formation of blood because it occurs in several oxidative enzymes including one involved in the transformation of inorganic iron into hemoglobin. There is little danger of deficiency in ordinary diets because of relatively abundant supply and minute daily requirements. Excessive copper in the body can be toxic, with vomiting, jaundice, hypotension, and sometimes coma; this may occur with excessive intake of medicinal copper salts or in metabolic conditions such as Menkes' syndrome or Wilson's disease.
copper 67 a radioisotope of copper, atomic mass 67, with a half-life of 2.58 days; used in radiotherapy as well as for imaging, tracer kinetic studies, and dosimetry.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cop·per (Cu),

(kop'er),
A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

copper

(kŏp′ər)
n.
A ductile malleable metallic element with atomic number 29 that is a component of various enzymes, is used in its salt forms as an astringent, deodorant, and antifungal, and whose radioisotope is used in brain scans and for diagnosing Wilson disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

copper

Biochemistry
A metallic element (atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56) that is an essential trace mineral linked to key metabolic reactions, including in iron absorption and metabolism, and the formation of red blood cells and nerves; it is present in mollusks, organ meats, nuts, legumes and seeds.
 
Homeopathy
Cuprum met, see there; Cuprum metallicum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

copper

A metallic element–atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.56; it is an essential trace mineral, and required in certain metabolic reactions–eg, iron absorption and metabolism, and formation of RBCs, nerves
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cop·per

(Cu) (kop'ĕr)
1. A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine.
2. A bioelement found in a number of proteins.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cop·per

(kop'ĕr)
A metallic element; several of its salts are used in medicine.
[L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. Cyprus, where it was mined]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about copper

Q. where I can have copper in my diet? I am having arthritis and recently I heard that copper can reduce some pain, from where I can have copper in my diet?

A. Oysters and other shellfish, whole grains, beans, nuts, potatoes, and organ meats (kidneys, liver) are good sources of copper. Dark leafy greens, dried fruits such as prunes, cocoa, black pepper, and yeast are also sources of copper in the diet. be careful in large amounts, copper is poisonous.

More discussions about copper
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cuprum is part of the Band A Mineracao group and has several mining projects located in South America including nearby in Chile.
Originally announced in October, the agreement required Empresas Penta S.A., a Chilean investment holding company and Inversiones Banpenta Limitada to sell their 63 percent ownership in Cuprum. Principal now owns 90.4 percent of the company and will attain the remaining shares quickly.
and Inversiones Banpenta Limitada to sell their 63 percent ownership in Cuprum pursuant to a public tender offer that also included the remaining 37 percent of publicly traded shares, which has been completed giving The Principal a 90.4 percent ownership stake in Cuprum.
Summary: In the present study 15 samples of Chinese therapeutic foods and herbs that are frequently consumed by people in both the East and West are analyzed, for the content of cadmium, mercury, lead, arsenic, cuprum and zinc, by atomic absorption spectrophotometer.
By using fiber optic, which has a very high broadband, FTTH network is capable to transmit data with higher capacity compare to the technology based on cuprum cable (Keiser 2000).
In the past retraction was implemented using various techniques like for example, the application of cuprum ferrule.
A few tinctures with the combination of copper are: (i) Cuprum aceticum, (ii) Cuprum Arsenicosum, (iii) Cuprum Metallicum and (iv) Cuprum Sulphuricum (81).