cuneiform

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Related to Cuneiform script: Hammurabi, Chinese script

cuneiform

 [ku-ne´ĭ-form]
wedge-shaped; applied particularly to three of the tarsal bones of the foot. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm), Avoid the mispronunciation cune'iform.
Wedge-shaped. See: intermediate cuneiform (bone), lateral cuneiform (bone), medial cuneiform (bone).

cuneiform

(kyo͞o′nē-ə-fôrm′, kyo͞o-nē′-)
adj.
1. Wedge-shaped.
2.
a. Of or relating to any of various related writing systems of the ancient Near East having characters formed by the arrangement of small wedge-shaped elements and used to write Sumerian, Akkadian, Elamite, Hittite, Old Persian, and other languages.
b. Relating to, composed in, or using such characters.
3. Anatomy Of, relating to, or being a wedge-shaped bone or cartilage.
n.
1. Cuneiform writing.
2. Anatomy A wedge-shaped bone, especially one of three such bones in the tarsus of the foot.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm)
1. Denotes anything wedge shaped.
2. Especially denotes three distal tarsal bones (i.e., the medial, lateral, and intermediate cuneiform bones).

cuneiform

1. Wedge-shaped.
2. One of the three wedge-shaped bones in the foot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clay tablets were used as the first writing medium when inscribed with cuneiform script around 3,000 B.C.
The Great Epic of Gilgamesh, some 1,500 years older than the poetry of Homer, is a collection of Sumerian legends immortalized in Akkadian cuneiform script on 12 clay tablets.
Our knowledge of Mesopotamian medicine is derived from records written in cuneiform script, mostly on clay tablets but occasionally engraved in stone.
The beginnings of cuneiform script, for instance, appear to lie in inventory-control.
One of the most exciting things about studying civilizations that wrote in cuneiform script on clay tablets, as did the Hittites, is that every year more documents come out of the soil, increasing our knowledge and modifying previously cherished views.
Although both the language and the cuneiform script they invented now can be read and more or less understood, there is no other language, ancient or modern, which can be unequivocally considered a cognate of Sumerian.
For example, the sixty-second minute and sixty-minute hour are noted, along with an explanation of the cuneiform script of documentation, which consists of early calculations on baked tablets and which opens a window into the rich mathematical history of Babylon.
Only a few people actually read the cuneiform script on stone monuments and other public objects.
Last century, archaeologists discovered what is believed to be one of the world's oldest cookbooks -- three clay tablets written in cuneiform script, dating to about 1700 B.C.
Podany defines the ancient Near East as those regions where the cuneiform script was the most common writing technology: Mesopotamia, Syria, Elam, and Anatolia (p.
Other large structures--including an administrative center containing clay tablets written in cuneiform script in the Akkadian language--are among the other discoveries.