cuneiform

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Related to Cuneiform script: Hammurabi, Chinese script

cuneiform

 [ku-ne´ĭ-form]
wedge-shaped; applied particularly to three of the tarsal bones of the foot. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm), Avoid the mispronunciation cune'iform.
Wedge-shaped. See: intermediate cuneiform (bone), lateral cuneiform (bone), medial cuneiform (bone).

cuneiform

/cu·ne·i·form/ (ku-ne´ĭ-form) wedge-shaped.

cuneiform

(kyo͞o′nē-ə-fôrm′, kyo͞o-nē′-)
adj.
1. Wedge-shaped.
2.
a. Of or relating to any of various related writing systems of the ancient Near East having characters formed by the arrangement of small wedge-shaped elements and used to write Sumerian, Akkadian, Elamite, Hittite, Old Persian, and other languages.
b. Relating to, composed in, or using such characters.
3. Anatomy Of, relating to, or being a wedge-shaped bone or cartilage.
n.
1. Cuneiform writing.
2. Anatomy A wedge-shaped bone, especially one of three such bones in the tarsus of the foot.

cuneiform

[kyo̅o̅nē′əfôrm′]
Etymology: L, cuneus, wedge, forma
1 adj, (of bone and cartilage) wedge-shaped.
2 n, bone of the foot between the navicular and metatarsals.

cu·ne·i·form

(kū'ne-i-fōrm)
1. Denotes anything wedge shaped.
2. Especially denotes three distal tarsal bones (i.e., the medial, lateral, and intermediate cuneiform bones).

cuneiform

1. Wedge-shaped.
2. One of the three wedge-shaped bones in the foot.

cuneate

; cuneiform wedge-shaped

cuneiform

1. wedge-shaped.
2. the first, second and third tarsal bones.

cuneiform process
processes of the arytenoid cartilage in dogs, or the epiglottic cartilages of horses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the curator enthusiastically produces ancient barley grains from huge storage jars and translates a plaque whose cuneiform script records the names of the builder and other local people.
Although both the language and the cuneiform script they invented now can be read and more or less understood, there is no other language, ancient or modern, which can be unequivocally considered a cognate of Sumerian.
For example, the sixty-second minute and sixty-minute hour are noted, along with an explanation of the cuneiform script of documentation, which consists of early calculations on baked tablets and which opens a window into the rich mathematical history of Babylon.
Only a few people actually read the cuneiform script on stone monuments and other public objects.
A clay tablet bearing ancient cuneiform script dating back to between 503BC and 504BC was discovered during a seven-week excavation in the southwestern side of the fort, along with a golden plate that has a figure of a woman engraved on it believed to belong to the era between 1BC and 1AD.
It was light brown, about the size of a mobile phone and covered in the jagged cuneiform script of the ancient Mesopotamians.
Finkel, an expert in deciphering ancient cuneiform script, discovered the text contained instructions for building a round coracle 65 metres in diameter, with walls six metres high.
The artifacts bear cuneiform script explaining administrative details of the Achaemenid Empire from about 500 BC.
It is inscribed all the way round with a proclamation in cuneiform script.
By contrast, the Akkadian language appears to have died in writing together with the obsolescence of the cuneiform script.
The relic was passed to his son Douglas, who took it to one of the few peop= le in the world who could read it as easily as the back of a cereal box - I= rving Finkel, a British Museum expert, who translated its 60 lines of neat = cuneiform script.
In the prologue to his fine study of the mysterious god-king Akhenaten, he tells of an old Egyptian peasant woman in 1887 digging up (with great disappointment it must be said) a cache of clay tablets inscribed in cuneiform script.