positive feedback

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pos·i·tive feed·back

that which occurs when the sign or sense of the returned signal results in increased amplification or leads to instability.

positive feedback

1 (in physiology) an increase in function in response to a stimulus. For example, micturition increases after the flow of urine has started, and the uterus contracts more frequently and with greater strength after it has begun to contract in labor.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
an encouraging, favorable, or otherwise positive response from one person to what another person has communicated.

positive feedback

See Feedback.

pos·i·tive feed·back

(pozi-tiv fēdbak)
That found when the sign or sense of the returned signal results in increased amplification or leads to instability.

positive feedback

The characteristic of any system with an output proportional to its input in which a portion of the output is fed back to the input in such a phase as to increase the input. The effect of this is rapidly, and sometimes dangerously, to increase the output. Compare NEGATIVE FEEDBACK.

positive feedback

see FEEDBACK MECHANISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Kaidor (1972), this Keynesian view is necessary to enable the Youngian cumulative causation process.
In turn, the analysis of these questions rests on three theoretical propositions: the technological gap trade theory, Thirlwall's Law, and the Kaldorian contributions relative to the cumulative causation processes.
Nevertheless, this does not prevent cumulative causation from following its course, which it does to the extent that all increases in the rate of equilibrium compatible with the external constraint are positively and significantly related with the increase in real production.
Third, we have confirmed that the Kaldorian cumulative causation processes operate effectively through the compliance of Verdoorn's Law, that is, the positive effect of increases in income over those observed in productivity.
In such a set-up the interaction between trade costs, increasing returns to scale (at the level of the firm), and forward and backward linkages creates the possibility of cumulative causation leading to the formation of new centres of activity.
However, as this occurs, so the moving firms create their own forward and backward linkages, and this makes it more attractive for subsequent firms to move, and so on, creating a process of cumulative causation.
Yet another process of cumulative causation is that the availability of surplus migrant labour brings down the wage rate (NCEUS 2007).
But if they increase then there is cumulative causation - doing more of the activity raises the returns to it.
In reality, decline will not be as abrupt as this suggests, but the general point is that cumulative causation can work in reverse, with contraction of the sector.

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