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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr),
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in media of various kinds.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, that is, cell culture.
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics, and customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

culture

(kŭl′chər)
n.
Biology
a. The growing of microorganisms, tissue cells, or other living matter in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. Such a growth or colony, as of bacteria.
tr.v. cul·tured, cul·turing, cul·tures
a. To grow (microorganisms or other living matter) in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. To use (a substance) as a medium for culture: culture milk.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

culture

Agriculture
The growth of comestibles.

Microbiology
adjective Pertaining to a culture—e.g., culture plate.
 
noun A general term for a propagation of microorganisms—e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses—in/on a growth media, or specimen so cultured, and the medium—agar, broth, etc.—in which it is being grown, under controlled conditions.
 
verb To place a specimen—which may contain pathogenic microorganisms—in a growth medium, under conditions intended to optimise the proliferation of those pathogens.

Molecular biology
The growth of cells.

Sexology
A swinging term for a particular type of sexual fetish or “art”.

Social medicine
A way of life for a particular ethnic group, which may include a language of communication, customs (rites, rituals), religion, lifestyle, shared system of values, beliefs, morals and social norms (patterns of behaviour), which can include dress and diet.

Vox populi
The training, development and refinement of mind, tastes and manners; the condition of being thus trained and refined; the intellectual side of civilisation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

HIV test

Various tests have been used to detect HIV and production of antibodies thereto; some HTs shown below are no longer actively used, but are listed for completeness and context. See HIV, Immunoblot.
HIV tests
Culture The direct culture of HIV in the appropriate cell–human lymphocytes
IgA assay An immunoblot-type assay which allows the early diagnosis in infants of perinatal HIV infection
p24 antigen The measurement of HIV's p24 antigen by immunoassay, confirmation by neutralization; very low sensitivity
PCR Amplification of HIV nucleotide sequences by PCR, used to confirm indeterminate Western blot results
RNA testing
Western blot An immune assay which detects specific antibodies to HIV antigens, including p24–often the first antibody to appear; low-risk individuals with a persisting indeterminant Western blot at 3 months may be regarded as negative and require no further followup
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in various media.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, i.e., cell culture.
See: cell culture
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics; customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

culture

See BACTERIAL CULTURE, TISSUE CULTURE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Culture

A laboratory procedure in which a sample from a wound, the blood or other body fluid is taken from an infected person. The sample is placed in conditions under which bacteria can grow. If bacteria grow, identification tests are done to determine the bacteria species causing the infection.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
Propagation of microorganisms on or in any media.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This year Merseyside has hosted trade missions from Boston, Georgia and South Carolina, while Liverpool and Memphis, Tennessee, have become "Rock'n Soul Mates" to build trade and cultural links.
In addition to all these traditional ethnic and religious connections, Russia's cultural links with the region might also be seen outcome of its Eurasian character.
Shared linguistic and cultural links make it easier for Montrealers to establish themselves abroad.
He said the Kashmiri people again reaffirmed their resolve while approving the accession to Pakistan resolution on July 19 in 1947 and saying that it was irrefutable fact the state of Jammu and Kashmir was natural part of Pakistan by geography, history, civilization, language and cultural links.
The visit also underlines the strong UK-Pakistan relationship on trade, sporting and cultural links between the two countries.
Tracing the historical and cultural links which runs deep into the civilizations ethos of the two regions, he said Pakistan and CARs are linked from ancient time of Silk Road which transported Buddhism from Taxila to Central Asia to the medieval empires in South Asia including the Mughals.About the cultural links, he said the imprint of CARs on the social fabric of Pakistan is reflected in its architectural heritage, cuisines, art, music, folklore literature,language and customs.
He said Pakistan shared with SCO and its members, deep-rooted historical and cultural links and strong economic and strategic complementarity.
They include a guarantee of pensions, more funding for the Scottish-run NHS, the benefit of 600,000 jobs that rely on trade with the UK, a stable shared currency and all the family and cultural links that keep Britain together.
Coun Paul Watson, chairman of ANEC, added: "ANEC welcomes positive steps in strengthening existing relations and creating new businesses and cultural links between the North East and South Africa.
Though India and Trinidad and Tobago have strong historical and cultural links, the volume of bilateral trade remains significantly low compared to India's economic engagements with other nations.
A HIGH-LEVEL delegation of Arab diplomats visited Liverpool to promote cultural links with the city and the international Arab community.

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