cultural competence

(redirected from Cultural Competency)
The ability to understand, appreciate, and interact with persons from cultures and/or belief systems other than one’s own, based on various factors
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cultural competence

Social medicine The ability to understand, appreciate, and interact with persons from cultures and/or belief systems other than one's own
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cul·tur·al com·pe·tence

(kŭl'chŭr-ăl kom'pĕ-tĕns)
nursing Knowledge and understanding of another person's culture; adapting interventions and approaches to health care to the specific culture of the patient, family, and social group.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cultural competence

Possession of the knowledge and skills required to manage cross-cultural relationships effectively. Cultural incompetence in doctors and other medical staff can seriously prejudice clinical management.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Offering immersion courses in undergraduate programs is one way to facilitate excellence in cultural competency. Literature on study abroad programs has highlighted their positive effects for both faculty and students in delivering culturally competent care (Bentley & Ellison, 2007).
The need for cultural competency training in the healthcare field - where all people of all backgrounds come together at moments of distress - is obvious.
It's only going to increase cultural competency, and increased cultural competency contributes to providing a culturally safe environment," said Lee.
Awaad (2003) states that cultural competency refers to the awareness among health care professionals of differences in cultures and the effect of these differences on professional practice.
The exploratory report, based on a survey of mental health providers nationally, found few community-based providers met criteria for military cultural competency or used evidence-based approaches to treat problems commonly seen among veterans.
(1) However, the virtual absence of multicultural education as a standalone course in chiropractic colleges suggests that graduates are ill-equipped in cultural competency to treat a diverse population.
Efforts to improve the cultural competency of the health care workforce have been part of the larger effort to reform the health care system in general in some states.
BACKGROUND Cultural competency is a core curriculum standard in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs.
Physicians in rural areas of BC's north are getting special training through the "Indigenous Cultural Competency program" in order to deliver better care to Aboriginal patients.
Cultural competency is described as a set of congruent practice skills, behaviors, attitudes and policies that come embedded in a system, agency, or among consumer providers and professionals.
Coverage includes an overview of cultural foundations, cultural competency, and transcultural nursing/health care followed by guidance for specific cultural groups--Black Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asians/Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and Whites (Non-Hispanic).
As a result, many Native students will be taught by non-Native teachers with limited training in cultural competency. Cultural competency in this context refers to teachers' knowledge of and ability to incorporate their students' cultural, social, and linguistic backgrounds into curriculum and instruction (Banks et ah, 2005).

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