culture

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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr),
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in media of various kinds.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, that is, cell culture.
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics, and customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]

culture

(kŭl′chər)
n.
Biology
a. The growing of microorganisms, tissue cells, or other living matter in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. Such a growth or colony, as of bacteria.
tr.v. cul·tured, cul·turing, cul·tures
a. To grow (microorganisms or other living matter) in a specially prepared nutrient medium.
b. To use (a substance) as a medium for culture: culture milk.

culture

Agriculture
The growth of comestibles.

Microbiology
adjective Pertaining to a culture—e.g., culture plate.
 
noun A general term for a propagation of microorganisms—e.g., bacteria, fungi, viruses—in/on a growth media, or specimen so cultured, and the medium—agar, broth, etc.—in which it is being grown, under controlled conditions.
 
verb To place a specimen—which may contain pathogenic microorganisms—in a growth medium, under conditions intended to optimise the proliferation of those pathogens.

Molecular biology
The growth of cells.

Sexology
A swinging term for a particular type of sexual fetish or “art”.

Social medicine
A way of life for a particular ethnic group, which may include a language of communication, customs (rites, rituals), religion, lifestyle, shared system of values, beliefs, morals and social norms (patterns of behaviour), which can include dress and diet.

Vox populi
The training, development and refinement of mind, tastes and manners; the condition of being thus trained and refined; the intellectual side of civilisation.

HIV test

Various tests have been used to detect HIV and production of antibodies thereto; some HTs shown below are no longer actively used, but are listed for completeness and context. See HIV, Immunoblot.
HIV tests
Culture The direct culture of HIV in the appropriate cell–human lymphocytes
IgA assay An immunoblot-type assay which allows the early diagnosis in infants of perinatal HIV infection
p24 antigen The measurement of HIV's p24 antigen by immunoassay, confirmation by neutralization; very low sensitivity
PCR Amplification of HIV nucleotide sequences by PCR, used to confirm indeterminate Western blot results
RNA testing
Western blot An immune assay which detects specific antibodies to HIV antigens, including p24–often the first antibody to appear; low-risk individuals with a persisting indeterminant Western blot at 3 months may be regarded as negative and require no further followup

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
1. The propagation of microorganisms on or in various media.
2. A mass of microorganisms on or in a medium.
3. The propagation of mammalian cells, i.e., cell culture.
See: cell culture
4. A set of beliefs, values, artistic, historical, and religious characteristics; customs common to a community or nation.
Synonym(s): cultivation.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]

culture

See BACTERIAL CULTURE, TISSUE CULTURE.

Culture

A laboratory procedure in which a sample from a wound, the blood or other body fluid is taken from an infected person. The sample is placed in conditions under which bacteria can grow. If bacteria grow, identification tests are done to determine the bacteria species causing the infection.

cul·ture

(kŭl'chŭr)
Propagation of microorganisms on or in any media.
[L. cultura, tillage, fr. colo, pp. cultus, to till]
References in periodicals archive ?
[paragraph]Dos cultres de pergamino syn guarnicion.
[paragraph]Mas dos cultres de pergamino syn guarnicion.
Although she comments that cultres and other amuletic objects and images reflected "un tipo de religiosidad que estaba vinculado a determinadas plegarias y rezos" ("a form of religiosity linked to certain supplications and prayers"), (40) she otherwise restricts her analysis of the term to a handful of isolated remarks in periodical publications.
Additional references to cultres show up in archival records detailing the personal property of Juana la Loca (d.
The dominant theme of female empowerment and its corollary, emasculation, lead me to speculate that Flores's audience would have understood the ladies' buxetas--surrogate cultres, in the narrator's words--as having a phallic design.
The first, he says, is when some vain condition is deemed necessary for a certain outcome, as when holy words are written on parchment and not paper, and at such and such a time and on such and such a day, or in lines of such and such a shape, just as some clerics would offer cultres written inside many circles, and made a good living off of foolish women, and even dim-witted men would seek them out; and certainly it is the height of animal stupidity to think that because words are written in a large or small script, within circles or squares, they are somehow more powerful." Pineda's source is Cajetan's commentary on the Summa theologix of Aquinas, part II.2, Q.
"Two gold cultres which weighed fifteen castellanos and five tomines and eight grains which Diego de Ayala gave her majesty in 1510, according to what appears in another book kept by the aforesaid Garcia de Carreno, which is in the chamber of the Contaduria de Cuentas, where it was produced to satisfy the requirements of this accounting."
Muller, Jewels in Spain, discusses several jewels and jeweled cases which are similar in use and/or design to cultres, including a hollow (?) tubular cross described in 1503 (18), a Hispano-Moresque cassolette (23), a reliquary pendant "with two small half-doors" probably from the collection of Juana la Loca (51; cf.