cubital tunnel syndrome


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cubital tunnel syndrome

a group of symptoms that develop from compression of the ulnar nerve within the cubital tunnel at the elbow; can include paresthesia into the fourth and fifth digits and weakness of some of the intrinsic muscles of the hand.

cu·bi·tal tun·nel syn·drome

(kyū'bi-tăl tŭn'ĕl sin'drōm)
A group of symptoms that develop from compression of the ulnar nerve within the cubital tunnel at the elbow (i.e., medial part of elbow); can include paresthesia into the fourth and fifth digits and weakness of the intrinsic muscles of the hand.

cubital tunnel syndrome

Medial elbow pain, hand fatigue, and sensations in the fourth and fifth fingers resulting from ulnar nerve damage in the cubital tunnel. This condition is frequently seen in throwing athletes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we retrospectively reviewed long-term alterations in elbow range of motion (ROM) and functional outcomes of patients who underwent anterior subcutaneous transposition of the ulnar nerve for cubital tunnel syndrome.
3,4 There are only a few cases reported in literature regarding cubital tunnel syndrome caused by tophi in the elbow.
Provocative testing of cubital tunnel syndrome includes Tinel's sign (performed over the cubital tunnel), the elbow flexion test (performed with elbow in maximum flexion and wrist at neutral position and held for 60 seconds), and the pressure provocation test (performed by applying pressure to the ulnar nerve just proximal to the cubital tunnel with your index and long fingers for 60 seconds while the patient's elbow is at 20[degrees] flexion with the forearm supinated).
Cubital tunnel syndrome is a concise term for conditions that result in strain on the ulnar nerve at the elbow.
She presented data from a prospective study in which 169 patients and 109 controls were evaluated for carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes using Tinel's sign, Phalen's test, elbow flexion, and the scratch-collapse test.
Cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) is the second most common peripheral mononeuropathy, and electrophysiological studies are the key method to confirm the CubTS diagnosis.
When associated with ulnar neuritis and/or cubital tunnel syndrome, radicular symptoms to the 4th and 5th digits may be noted by the patient.
Cubital tunnel syndrome occurs as a result of compression of the ulnar nerve between the medial epicondyle, the olecranon and the roof of the tunnel that is formed by the retinaculum which is also known as Osborne's band or the arcuate ligament.
Exclusion criteria were the following: the presence of symptoms for more than a year, acute findings, a history of steroid injections or physical therapy, systemic disease, a two-point discrimination distance of greater than 6 mm, the presence of thenar atrophy, more proximal complex neuropathy, cervical discopathy, cervical Da Costa's syndrome, shoulder, elbow, wrist, or finger problems (frozen shoulder, epicondylitis, cubital tunnel syndrome, history of wrist fracture, trigger finger), the presence of a pacemaker, and other etiological causes leading to CTS, e.
Elbow pain may have numerous causes including those that are common such as medial or lateral epicondylosis, partial or full tearing of the medial or lateral collateral ligaments of the elbow, cubital tunnel syndrome, pronator quadratus syndrome, intra-articular injuries, epiphesial injuries, symptomatic osteophytes and anterior interosseous nerve entrapment.
The most common of these injuries or disorders reported among laboratory workers include carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), tendinitis, epicondylitis (tennis elbow), tenosynovitis, trigger finger, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome, and tension neck syndrome.